This $270 toaster makes just ONE piece of toast at a time

Japanese company releases a $270 TOASTER that makes just ONE piece of toast at a time so people can ‘focus on a single slice, and treat it with respect’

  • Mitsubishi Electric Corp. debuted its ‘Bread Oven’ in Japan last month 
  • It sells for 29,000 to 30,000 yen ($263.49 to $272.58, or £207.09 to £214.23)
  • The waffle iron-like appliance can toast just one piece of bread at a time and seals in moisture
  • ‘We’re not asking customers to get rid of their toasters, but to enjoy this as an entirely different category,’ said a spokesperson 

A Japanese appliance company is selling a $270 toaster — which can only toast a single piece of bread at a time.

Mitsubishi Electric Corp. debuted its ‘Bread Oven’ in Japan last month, selling the single-function appliance for for 29,000 to 30,000 yen ($263.49 to $272.58, or £207.09 to £214.23).

But the compact machine, which is shaped similarly to a waffle maker and has four different buttons, is designed so that it may only cook one piece of toast at once.

Fancy schmancy! Mitsubishi Electric Corp. debuted its $270 ‘Bread Oven’ in Japan last month

Every home needs one! The waffle iron-like appliance can toast just one piece of bread at a time and seals in moisture

‘We’re not asking customers to get rid of their toasters, but to enjoy this as an entirely different category,’ said a spokesperson

The Bread Oven is meant to make the perfect piece of toast — it’s less concerned with efficiency.

‘We wanted to focus on the single slice, and treat it with respect,’ Akihiro Iwahara, who runs technical development for Mitsubishi Electric’s, told Bloomberg. 

Unlike a toaster that is open on top or a toaster oven which has lots of room for air to circulate, the Bread Oven completely closes to trap and seal moisture inside, toasting the bread without drying it out.

A slice is placed inside two metal plates and heats on the top and bottom, which can get up to 500 degrees Fahrenheit (260 degrees Celsius).

It’s also designed to look nice, as it’s meant to sit on a dining table and not be hidden away on a kitchen counter.  

Unsurprisingly, social media users have had quite a lot to say about the appliance.

‘In Japan, perfection matters. Toasters in Japan sell for over $200 & focus on making *one* piece of toast at a time,’ wrote one, quoting Mr. Iwahara. ‘We’ve reached peak Japan.’

‘I know it’s late but look at this toaster. It’s $270 but it’s peak Japanese Industrial Design. It only does one slice at a time but who cares,’ wrote another.

‘I mean, can you put a price on a perfect piece of toast?’ joked Bloomberg’s Alice Truong.

‘It’s crap without the $500 butter spreader I’m selling…’ quipped another user 

While a few said they’d definitely ‘buy this,’ most couldn’t imagine splashing out so much on a toaster.

‘My toaster costs $10. For a net profit of $260 I think I’m fine with slightly dry toast, given that putting butter or jam on it regardless,’ wrote one. 

Melted: While some aren’t so excited about its toast capabilities, they have high hopes for how grilled cheese would turn out in the contraption

Customer base: Some people said they’d most certainly buy it, though some may have only been half-serious

Works OK! This person, though, is perfectly fine with his much less expensive toaster

Not splurging just yet: Others said their cheap toasters work perfectly well

Some in particular latched onto a quote by Kaori Kajita, founder of the Japan Butter Toast Association, who said that there’s nothing more ‘enchanting’ than the perfect slice of toast.

According to Bloomberg, though the price seems outrageous, there is a market for the oven in Japan. 

Toast made with a square white bread called shoku pan has become in increasingly popular, particularly to eat with breakfast. Another brand called Balmuda even debuted a $230 toaster a few years ago. 

‘Given Japanese tastes, there are a lot of people looking for a refined and delicate experience,’ Hiroaki Higuchi, general manager for marketing at Mitsubishi Electric’s home-appliance unit, told the outlet. 

‘We’re not asking customers to get rid of their toasters, but to enjoy this as an entirely different category.’

Source: Read Full Article