What the New Moon and Solar Eclipse in Cancer Have in Store for Your Zodiac Sign

Fourth of July weekend is like the Super Bowl of summer. You’ve got your snacks, your plans, and, of course, your outfit all lined up in advance, so you can max out your fun.

Well, this year, there’s some serious astrological action happening just before Independence Day. A new moon and a solar eclipse are taking over the sky on July 2nd, but they’re not just an opening act for your 4th of July fireworks.

In case you’re not totally up to speed on astronomy lingo, a “new moon” happens when the moon is in line with the sun, making it basically invisible from Earth. There are 12 new moons a year, each corresponding with a different zodiac sign. But this one’s a little different, since it’s happening along with a solar eclipse (a.k.a. when the moon blocks out the sun for people watching on Earth).

Oh, and it’s all going down, er, up in the sign of Cancer, meaning you’ll crave security around this time, according to Donna Page, a certified astrologer in Atlanta. Here’s what else you can expect from the new moon and solar eclipse in Cancer:

What does the new moon and solar eclipse in Cancer mean for your sign?

For the record, a solar eclipse **always** happens with a new moon. But this one’s a total eclipse, which, “in astrology terms, does make it more significant,” says Page. Unfortunately, you won’t be able to see it in the U.S.—womp womp.

Of course, you’ll still ~feel~ its effects. Having a solar eclipse at the same time as a new moon basically just makes everything super-charged, and this particular astrological combo is focused on family, food, comfort, and security, Page says. “This new moon is more powerful, making you pay attention to these areas,” she explains.

You’ll find yourself wondering if you have all the comfort and security you crave—and, if not, WTH you can do to get it already. You may also notice some serious FOMO vibes going on. Why can’t you have it all? And why does Kylie Jenner get to Postmates everything, while you have to schlep to Trader Joe’s and wait in crazy-long lines just to get the bare necessities? (To be fair, those peanut butter-filled pretzels were #worthit.)

But now isn’t the time to throw yourself a pity party—and not just cuz you’re already busy planning a 4th of July BBQ. Instead, focus on what you do have going on in your life (ever heard of JOMO?). “Pay attention to where your fortune is in your life right now,” Page says. “Think about your abundance and your good luck. You will find it.”

While you’re at it, now is a good time to let go of any past restrictions on what you should and shouldn’t do. That can just end up holding you back from what’s actually important to you, Page says.

The new moon/solar eclipse will impact all zodiac signs, but Page says Cancer will feel it the most, followed by Capricorn and Leo.

How will the new moon and solar eclipse in Cancer affect the rest of your month and year?

Well, for starters, you’ll probably whip up some pretty epic food to celebrate the 4th. (So…all those cravings? Satisfied.) You’ll also want to spend it with the fam, and that combo of good food and quality time spent with people you love can create some awesome memories you’ll all treasure going forward.

You might also find yourself making some changes around this time to try to get more job security or earn more money, which could definitely impact your day-to-day down the road. Whether you start putting in more hours at work or jump into a new side hustle, you can expect that extra effort to make a difference a year from now.

Ultimately, it’s best to use this time to gauge where you’re at and where you want to be—and then actually do something about it. (Starting July 5th, of course…)

When is the next new moon?

The next new moon is happening on August 1st, and it’s in Leo, Page says. That can be a great time for you to ~shine~, and you certainly won’t mind being the center of attention—at least for a day or two.

For now though, just focus on making it a Fourth to remember.

From: Women’s Health US

Source: Read Full Article