Complaints Facebook Memories is reviving events they want to forget

‘Ever have a bad day and then Facebook Memories just ruins it some more?’: Users complain the site’s new tool is reviving events they’d rather forget

  • Facebook on Monday rolled out a new ‘Memories’ section for all users globally
  • It lets users reminisce on old posts, moments and friends made on a certain day
  • Many users reacted poorly, saying it reminds them of things they want to forget
  • The tool builds on Facebook’s ‘On This Day’ feature, launched a few years ago
  • Includes controls so that users see more positive posts and not negative ones
  • e-mail

39

View
comments

Facebook has launched a new section on its website that lets users take a walk down memory lane, but many people are less than thrilled.

Called ‘Memories,’ the tab is essentially an extension of the social media giant’s ‘On This Day’ feature, which was rolled out a few years ago. 

It lets users browse through old posts and other content posted on Facebook from years past. 

For some users, however, this means reminders of bad breakups, embarrassing moments, and other events they’d wished to forget.  

Scroll down for video 


Facebook has launched a new section on its site, called ‘Memories’, that’s essentially an extension of the social media giant’s ‘On This Day’ feature, launched a few years ago 

Many took to social media to point out the flaws in Facebook’s algorithm.

‘You ever have a bad day and then Facebook Memories just ruins it some more as if I didn’t wanna forget about a whole chunk of my life’, one user wrote.

‘Shout out to Facebook Memories for reminding people what a terrible mistake they made on the anniversary of a marriage they’re divorced from’, another said.

One Twitter user wrote: ‘You could also call this section “When You Used to Post on Facebook” which is what it has become’. 

Memories rolled out for Facebook’s desktop site and the app starting yesterday.

To access the new page, click on the ‘On this day’ tab on the left-hand side of Facebook’s desktop site or on the bottom right of the mobile app. 

The Memories page is broken down into several categories. 

‘On this Day’ will show ‘content you know and love,’ like past posts and major life events from a certain date. 





Users took to social media to point out the flaws in Facebook’s new algorithm. To access the new page, click on the ‘On this day’ tab on the left-hand side of Facebook’s desktop site or on the bottom right of the mobile app

‘Friends Made on this Day’ includes a list of friends users made on a certain day, along with video collages that ‘celebrate your friendversaries.’

Another section called ‘Recaps of Memories’ shows seasonal or monthly recaps of memories, combined into a message or short video. 

‘Memories You May Have Missed’ will show users any posts they may have missed from earlier in the week. 

Facebook says 90 million people use the ‘On This Day’ feature daily to ‘reminisce’ about things they’ve shared on Facebook. 


Facebook says 90 million people use the ‘On This Day’ feature (pictured) daily to ‘reminisce’ about things they’ve shared

What’s more researchers from Facebook recently found that ‘this kind of reflection can have a positive impact on people’s mood and overall well-being.’

The researchers found that people were most interested in ‘reminders of fun, interesting and important life moments.’

That’s why Facebook says it worked to perfect the feature so that it shows mostly positive memories and fewer negative ones. 

The company included controls in the Memories page to allow users to manage what content shows up there.  

‘We know that memories are deeply personal — and they’re not all positive,’ Facebook product manager Oren Hod wrote in a blog post. 

‘We try to listen to feedback and design these features so that they’re thoughtful and offer people the right controls that are easy to access,’

‘We work hard to ensure that we treat the content as part of each individual’s personal experience, and are thankful for the input people have shared with us over the past three years,’ Hod added. 

However, as many Twitter users pointed out, Facebook’s Memories algorithm isn’t entirely flawless yet. 






Facebook’s Memories feature is also another attempt by the site to focus on ‘time well spent’ on the site. 

The firm recently conducted a study that found ‘passive’ browsing on the site may negatively impact users’ happiness. 

Other activities, like messaging with friends, were more likely to positively impact users’ happiness.

The move comes as Facebook has also worked to prioritize posts from family and friends, instead of advertisements and videos, like it did previously. 




HOW HAS FACEBOOK CHANGED THE WAY IT PRIORITIZES POSTS IN YOUR NEWS FEED?

Up until January, Facebook prioritized material that its algorithms thought people would engage with through comments, ‘likes’ or other ways of showing interest.

But 33-year-old founder Mark Zuckerberg said earlier this year that he wants to change the focus to help users have ‘more meaningful social interactions.’

The move follows his resolution in 2018 to ‘fix’ the site. 

It is also in response to criticism that Facebook and its social media competitors reinforce users’ views on social and political issues.

Critics say sites like Facebook lead to addictive viewing habits.

Zuckerberg cited research that suggests reading ‘passively’ on social media was damaging for people’s mental health, while interacting proactively with friends was positive.

According to Adam Mosseri, Facebook’s New Feed boss, the changes means: 

  • Posts from friends and family now get more prominence that video, news, and other content from formal Facebook pages, such as companies and celebrities
  • The number of comments on a post count more than the number of Likes
  • Posts where people have spend the time to write lengthy comments are prioritized over those with only short comments
  • While, news and video still appear in News Feed, the number of friends sharing it will matter more than its overall popularity

Source: Read Full Article