Facebook tumbles from top spot on Glassdoor’s best place to work list

Facebook tumbles from top spot on Glassdoor’s best places to work list as damning report claims employees have a ‘bunker mentality’ following slew of scandals

  • After ranking No. 1 last year, Facebook now ranks seventh
  • Its score has dropped from a 4.6 to 4.5 award score out of a perfect 5

As Facebook battle new scandals every day, employees are revolting – and the firm has dropped dramatically from its top spot on Glassdoor’s annual list of the best places to work.  

After ranking No. 1 last year, Facebook now ranks seventh, dropping from a 4.6 to 4.5 award score out of a perfect 5.

Zoom Video Communications supplanted Facebook as the top seat in the tech category.

Scroll down for video 

CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifying before a combined Senate Judiciary and Commerce committee hearing:  After ranking No. 1 last year, Facebook now ranks seventh, dropping from a 4.6 to 4.5 award score out of a perfect 5.

THE TOP TEN FIRMS TO WORK AT 

 1. Bain & Company – 4.6 

2. Zoom Video Communications – 4.6 

3. In-N-Out Burger – 4.5 

4. Procore Technologies – 4.5 

5. Boston Consulting Group – 4.5 

6. LinkedIn  – 4.5 

7. Facebook – 4.5 

8. Google – 4.4 

9. lululemon – 4.4 

10. Southwest Airlines – 4.4

Source: Glassdoor  

 

It comes as, according to a new Buzzfeed investigation, staff are at rock bottom.

‘It’s otherwise rational, sane people who’re in Mark’s orbit spouting full-blown anti-media rhetoric, saying that the press is ganging up on Facebook,’ a former senior employee told BuzzFeed News. 

‘It’s the bunker mentality. These people have been under siege for 600 days now. They’re getting tired, getting cranky — the only survival strategy is to quit or fully buy in.’ 

According to Buzzfeed, employees posting on anonymous app Blind have even compared Zuckerberg to Hitler, responding to claims the Facebook founder should be allowed to run the company the way he wants. 

‘Funny, Hitler’s followers said something similar. We all know how that went,’ one user replied.

Facebook has been struggling with a seemingly neverending series of major flaws, from privacy issues to election meddling. 

Its senior management, in particular Mark Zuckerberg and Sheryl Sandberg, have come under fire.

In America, Russians accounts have been accused of using Facebook to harm Hilary Clinton’s prospects of being elected over Donald Trump. 

In the UK, some have claimed that misleading information was used to promote Brexit in the run up to the 2016 referendum.  


  • Scientists discover bacteria that eats microbes that destroy…


    Wisdom the Albatross, the world’s oldest breeding bird, to…


    ‘Dark fluid’ theory could finally explain the missing 95% of…


    Is Christmas in crisis? Swedish herders say there is not…

Share this article

Facebook’s senior management, in particular Mark Zuckerberg and Sheryl Sandberg, pictured, have come under fire.

It is also facing hugely damaging revelations of privacy data breaches among its accounts.

 In the latest disaster, it was revealed Facebook signed deals to give companies such as Netflix and AirBnB special access to user dater, a huge dossier of secret emails revealed today.

MP Damian Collins used parliamentary privilege to seize the documents from the founder of US app developer Six4Three who had them as part of a legal case against Facebook.

In an extraordinary move when founder Ted Kramer was passing through London in November, Mr Collins had him escorted to Parliament and threatened to imprison him if he didn’t hand them over. He promptly did so.

FACEBOOK’S SLEW OF SCANDALS

Facebook is facing allegations from all over the work that it has been used to spread ‘fake news’, interfere with elections, and peddle hate.

It is also facing hugely damaging revelations of privacy data breaches among its accounts.

Here are some of the controversies it has been embroiled in: 

‘Fake news’ and Russia 

Facebook has come under the spotlight amid claims that Russian accounts used the platform to spread ‘fake news’ during the 2016  Brexit referendum.

In America, Russians accounts have been accused of using Facebook to harm Hilary Clinton’s prospects of being elected over Donald Trump. 

In the UK, some have claimed that misleading information was used to promote Brexit in the run up to the 2016 referendum. 

Cambridge Analytica Scandal:

The data of around 87 million Facebook users was harvested by the company Cambridge Analytica (CA).

It has been claimed CA used the information to assess peoples’ personalities and come up with political strategies to sway voters to back Brexit and Donald Trump.

Spread of extremism and hate

Facebook has been repeatedly criticised for not being quick enough to take extremist content down from its site.

Critics have warned that Facebook has become a safe haven for extremists who peddle hate and try to recruit jihadis to kill and maim.

The trove of emails and private messages – which a US judge had ordered to be kept secret – reveal how Facebook let companies have special access to user data if they spent big on advertising. 

 

 

 

As Facebook battle new scandals every day, employees are revolting – and the firm has dropped dramatically from its top spot in Glassdoor’s annual list of the best places to work

 

 

 

THE BEST TECH FIRMS TO WORK AT 

 Zoom Video Communications supplanted Facebook as the top seat in the tech category. 

Google dropped three spots, landing at eighth place with an award score of 4.4. 

Amazon still hasn’t made it onto the list since Glassdoor first began publishing it in 2009, and this year, Amazon had a score of 4.1, just outside of the top 100.

Apple moved up from No. 84 to 71, though it maintained the same score of 4.3. 

Microsoft moved up from No. 39 to 34 although its award score dropped from 4.4 to 4.3.

 

Another former senior employee noted a growing sense of paranoia among current employees. ‘Now, people now have burner phones to talk shit about the company — not even to reporters, just to other employees,’ they told BuzzFeed News.

Some former workers have been empowered to bypass the press altogether and speak openly about their situations. Last month, Mark S. Luckie, a strategic partner manager for global influencers who quit in November, posted a 2,500-word memo that he had previously sent internally at the company to his personal Facebook to highlight what he saw as the company’s ‘black people problem.’

‘In some buildings, there are more ‘Black Lives Matter’ posters than there are actual black people,’ Luckie wrote, adding that ‘Black employees are commonly told ‘I didn’t know black people worked at Facebook.’ That post later mysteriously disappeared from Facebook after being flagged for violating the social network’s ‘community standards’ before it was later restored. 

 

Source: Read Full Article