New platform is launched that can ban online trolls from concerts

New tickets website is launched that can ban online trolls from concerts, use facial recognition to stop touts and catch out crooks using stolen credit cards

  • Barrister builds platform which can ban revellers who post offensive content
  • An algorithm will scan through content online and measure posts for sentiment
  • Concertgoers will need to take a photo of themselves when buying event tickets
  • This can be used for facial recognition technology and could stop ticket touts 

People who post offensive content online could be denied entry to concerts and events by a new events website that can spot abusive messages in customers’ social media posts. 

A barrister specialising in technology law has set up a new platform which will examine social media posts for sentiment via algorithms scanning through content.

Richard Ryan, who is also CEO of security firm SentiaGPR, has created a new platform called Vertus Fusion which can be used by venues, artists and ticket providers.

A barrister specialising in technology law has set up a new platform which will measure posts for sentiment via algorithms which scan through content online. A ticket will not be issued if the platform discovers the customer has posted offensive material [File photo]

Ticket buyers will need to take a photo of themselves when buying a ticket online which can be used for facial recognition technology at the event.

When customers provide their details and take a picture of themselves, their identity can be verified using the internet. 

If the platform discovers the customer has posted offensive material including hate speech online, then a ticket will not be issued. 

The platform will also cancel the tickets of concertgoers if they have been bought using stolen credit cards, and the photo recognition process could stop ticket touts.

The platform also monitors social media output around an event using a ‘geo-fence’, which can monitor posts put out on more than 40 social media platforms in any language. 

Mr Ryan set up the company alongside his business partners who have backgrounds in the military and New Scotland Yard.

It follows an interview last week where another top security expert said that stadiums have not changed in almost two years since the Manchester Arena attack at an Ariana Grande concert.  

Mr Ryan said: ‘We have developed a secure ticket platform which can work with ticket providers and venues.

‘Details are sent from the ticket provider, we can verify their identity, and we can remove that ticket if they have given another identity or if they have posted hate material or inciteful things’. 

The Manchester Arena bombing killed more than 20 people almost two years ago in May 2017.

Ticket buyers will need to take a photo of themselves when buying a ticket online which can be used for facial recognition technology. The platform will cancel the tickets of concertgoers if they have been bought using stolen credit cards [File photo]

It was reported that the attacker had posted on social media hours before the attack with pro-Islamic State messages. 

Mr Ryan said: ‘Terrorists want to put this information out there to say what they are going to do. We can put a geo-fence around any arena in the world, in any language, and monitor it. 

‘If someone comes up as a threat, we analyse that person’s profile by going to different places on the web where we can make a decision on risk. 

Mr Ryan hopes the platform will be extended to railway stations, airports and any other crowded places.

On the issue of privacy, the barrister and CEO said: ‘We do take data sensitivity seriously and we are GDPR compliant. 

‘We are looking to prevent harm to people by using what is out there on the internet.  

‘How much do you put on the cost of life? If I’m sending children to a concert, I want to know that security teams are looking out for them and also that venues are doing the most they can to protect them’.   

Source: Read Full Article