• The Duchess of Cambridge wore a pair of $109 earrings by Missoma, a jewelry brand loved by her sister-in-law Meghan Markle. 
  • She completed the look with a floral print face mask and a red collared dress by Beulah London for a day of engagements in London.
  • The Duchess of Sussex first wore the brand during a visit to Edinburgh, Scotland in 2018. She has been pictured wearing Missoma rings and a gold leaf bracelet.
  • Visit Insider's homepage for more stories.

The Duchess of Cambridge wore one of Meghan Markle's favorite jewelry brands for a day of engagements in London on Tuesday.

Kate Middleton opted for a pair of £85 ($109) earrings by Missoma, along with a floral print face mask and a red collared dress by Beulah London.

The gold mini pyramid charm hoops — which are still available on Missoma's website — are reminiscent of jewelry previously worn by the Duchess of Sussex during her time as a working royal. 

The Duchess of Cambridge in London on Tuesday.
HENRY NICHOLLS / POOL / AFP via Getty Images

Markle has been photographed wearing Missoma on several occasions over the years.

The duchess was first pictured wearing a ring from the brand's Shine Bright collection during a visit to Edinburgh, Scotland several months before her wedding in 2018, according to the royal fashion site Dress Like a Duchess.

The Duchess of Sussex wearing a Missoma ring in Edinburgh, Scotland.
Max Mumby/Getty Images

She then wore the brand's gold leaf bracelet and Open Heart Signet ring for an outing in Sussex later that year, the site notes.

Middleton has recently started wearing the brand's earrings, opting for a pair of gold chandelier hoops during a royal tour of Pakistan last year.

The brand has been worn by multiple celebrities, including Gigi Hadid, Jessica Biel, Julia Roberts, and Karlie Kloss.

It's not the first time the duchesses have shared a similar preference when it comes to jewelry. Last year Middleton and Markle were photographed wearing earrings from high street brands with designer dresses. Fashion expert Cécile Duclos told Insider it could be a strategic move used to appeal to "a wide socio-economical range of people."

Source: Read Full Article