We will use your email address only for sending you newsletters. Please see our Privacy Notice for details of your data protection rights.

Following Freddie Mercury’s death in 1991, the remaining members of Queen have sought to keep his memory and legacy alive and well. Firstly, Brian May, Roger Taylor and John Deacon put on a charity tribute concert in 1992 before releasing their final studio album together in 1995’s Made In Heaven. The record featured posthumous recordings of Freddie’s vocals which the trio played along with.

And now as Queen and Adam Lambert release their live album Live Around The World, the band continue to pay tribute to him.

Most notably one of the tracks is a recording of Brian May’s acoustic performance of Love of My Life.

Freddie’s song is a quieter and more intimate moment of the Queen and Adam Lambert concerts and now May has opened up on missing Freddie when he plays that part of the show.

Speaking exclusively with Express.co.uk, the 73-year-old spoke of how the audience turn their phone lights on before a virtual Freddie sings Love of My Life’s final verse on a big screen.

May said: “It’s just a beautiful moment, I love it so much. 

“By that time the audience have lit up all their phones and we have a moment.

“The crowning glory is Freddie coming on and tying the whole thing up with a great sense of humour as he always did have, which I think is the icing on the cake. And then he’s gone and that’s it.”

The Queen guitarist shared how the moment affects everybody, but perhaps most of all himself.

May continued: “I can never get used to that. We act in all different ways. Sometimes it’s full of joy, sometimes it’s great sadness because he’s not actually there.

“But mostly I feel grateful for all the stuff we did and the fact that we can still honour him, to include him in our show.”

Queen and Adam Lambert’s new live album also features two other Freddie tributes which include I Was Born To Love You.

The Freddie Mercury solo album track was reworked into a rock song for Made In Heaven, before Queen and Adam Lambert debuted it live in Japan six years ago.

DON’T MISS
Freddie Mercury: Derren Brown on painting ‘EXTRAORDINARY’ Queen singer [EXCLUSIVE]

Queen and Adam Lambert: Brian May very excited for THIS – ‘Eeeek!’ [BRIAN MAY]
Queen’s Brian May compares ‘GIFTED’ Adam Lambert with Freddie Mercury [INTERVIEW]

Additionally, the album honours Freddie with The Show Must Go On, the final track of Queen’s 1991 album, Innuendo.

Tragically, the singer was never able to sing it live before his death.

On recording the song in Freddie’s final months, May said: “Even though we were all aware of Freddie’s impending tragedy, we had some inspired and joyful times in the studio, making the Innuendo album.

“We didn’t speak much about Freddie’s illness – he just wanted to get on with ‘business as usual’ as far as possible.”

May added: “But already there was only a day or two per week when Freddie was well enough to come in and work with us.

“We grabbed those precious moments and made the most of them. I’d been working on The Show Must Go On as an idea, but I was uncertain whether the title was too obvious.

“Freddie heard it and loved it and dismissed any thoughts that there was a problem with the chorus or the title. He wanted to work on it.”

Queen and Adam Lambert’s live album Live Around The World is out now.

Source: Read Full Article