Forget a resume! Face-scanning AI scores candidates’ facial movements, words and voice to determine how qualified they are for a job position

  • AI scores candidates based on facial movements, voice tone and word choices
  • Ranks information against others who are applying for the same position
  • Places candidates into high, medium and low tiers based ‘likelihood of success’
  • Employers have been found to only pursue those the AI likes the best 

Your resume may not be the only deciding factor for landing your next job – it could be an ’employability score’ created by artificial intelligence that has the final vote.

More than 100 big name firms are using HireVue’s AI-driven assessment, which is technology that ranks candidates based on their facial movements, choice of words and speaking voice. 

Although employers can pursue any candidate, many who have been interviewed by the AI have found that firms usually focused on those the computer system liked best.

Scroll down for video 

More than 100 employers are using HireVue’s AI-driven assessment that ranks candidates based on their facial movements, choice of words and speaking voice

HireVue’s technology is employed by many large name companies such as Hilton Hotels, Unilever and Goldman Sachs, according to The Washington Post.

And with hundreds of applications flooding in for just a single position, the AI has made it easy for human employers to find the perfect candidate — but some experts believe the technology can do more harm than good. 

Candidates connect to HireVue’s system via their smartphone, tablet or computer.

Questions will pop-up on the screen that they answer.

The AI analyzes their facial movements, voice tone and choice of words during the 30-minute interview. 

Following the HireVue test, the AI creates a report card based on  their ‘competencies and behaviors,’ including their ‘willingness to learn,’ ‘conscientiousness & responsibility’ and ‘personal stability.’

These personality traits then group individuals into high, medium and low tiers based on their ‘likelihood of success.’ 

Meredith Whittaker, a co-founder of the AI Now Institute, a research center in New York, said, ‘It’s a profoundly disturbing development that we have proprietary technology that claims to differentiate between a productive worker and a worker who isn’t fit, based on their facial movements, their tone of voice, their mannerisms.’

‘It’s pseudoscience. It’s a license to discriminate,’ she added.

‘And the people whose lives and opportunities are literally being shaped by these systems don’t have any chance to weigh in.’

The assessment system connects to the candidate’s smartphone, tablet or computer camera, giving the AI a front row seat to the candidate’s facial movements, word choice and speaking voice.

Nathan Mondragon, HireVue’s chief industrial-organizational psychologist, told The Post the interviews are about 30 minutes and include more than a dozen questions that can ‘yield up to 500,000 data points’, which create the individual’s personal score. 

Questions are created by the employer, which are shown on the device for the interviewee to see and answer.

The system connects to the candidate’s smartphone, tablet or computer camera, allowing the potential employers to not only see them, but also gives the AI system a front row seat to the candidate’s facial movements, word choice and speaking voice

During this part of the interview, the AI monitors the person’s facial movements, which can reveal how excitable they are is or how easily angered they can be.

The AI gathers information from the interview and ranks what it has learned about the candidate against other applicants who have also interviewed for the same position. 

Those ‘Facial Action Units,’ Mondragon said, can make up 29 percent of a person’s score; the words they say and the ‘audio features’ of their voice, like tone, determine the rest.

The AI creates a report card based on ‘competencies and behaviors,’ including their ‘willingness to learn,’ ‘conscientiousness & responsibility’ and ‘personal stability.’ These personality traits then group individuals into high, medium and low tiers based on their ‘likelihood of success’

‘Humans are inconsistent by nature. They inject their subjectivity into the evaluations,’ Mondragon said. 

The system is trained using interviews from current employees in the position and their responses are crosschecked with a ‘benchmark of success’ , such as how well they met a sales quotas or how quickly they’d resolved customer calls.

And the best candidates for the position tend to mirror those who have already excelled in the position.

WHY ARE PEOPLE SO WORRIED ABOUT AI?

It is an issue troubling some of the greatest minds in the world at the moment, from Bill Gates to Elon Musk.

SpaceX and Tesla CEO Elon Musk described AI as our ‘biggest existential threat’ and likened its development as ‘summoning the demon’.

He believes super intelligent machines could use humans as pets.

Professor Stephen Hawking said it is a ‘near certainty’ that a major technological disaster will threaten humanity in the next 1,000 to 10,000 years.

They could steal jobs 

More than 60 percent of people fear that robots will lead to there being fewer jobs in the next ten years, according to a 2016 YouGov survey.

And 27 percent predict that it will decrease the number of jobs ‘a lot’ with previous research suggesting admin and service sector workers will be the hardest hit.

As well as posing a threat to our jobs, other experts believe AI could ‘go rogue’ and become too complex for scientists to understand.

A quarter of the respondents predicted robots will become part of everyday life in just 11 to 20 years, with 18 percent predicting this will happen within the next decade. 

They could ‘go rogue’ 

Computer scientist Professor Michael Wooldridge said AI machines could become so intricate that engineers don’t fully understand how they work.

If experts don’t understand how AI algorithms function, they won’t be able to predict when they fail.

This means driverless cars or intelligent robots could make unpredictable ‘out of character’ decisions during critical moments, which could put people in danger.

For instance, the AI behind a driverless car could choose to swerve into pedestrians or crash into barriers instead of deciding to drive sensibly.

They could wipe out humanity 

Some people believe AI will wipe out humans completely.

‘Eventually, I think human extinction will probably occur, and technology will likely play a part in this,’ DeepMind’s Shane Legg said in a recent interview.

He singled out artificial intelligence, or AI, as the ‘number one risk for this century’.

Musk warned that AI poses more of a threat to humanity than North Korea.

‘If you’re not concerned about AI safety, you should be. Vastly more risk than North Korea,’ the 46-year-old wrote on Twitter.

‘Nobody likes being regulated, but everything (cars, planes, food, drugs, etc) that’s a danger to the public is regulated. AI should be too.’

Musk has consistently advocated for governments and private institutions to apply regulations on AI technology.

He has argued that controls are necessary in order protect machines from advancing out of human control

Following the HireVue test, the AI creates a report card based on  their ‘competencies and behaviors,’ including their ‘willingness to learn,’ ‘conscientiousness & responsibility’ and ‘personal stability.’

These personality traits then group individuals into high, medium and low tiers based on their ‘likelihood of success.’ 

Although employers can choose who to purse, several candidates who have gone through the HireVue process told The Post that they usually focused on those the computer system liked best. 

 

Source: Read Full Article