Mystery ‘glowing ball’ UFO streaks through Russian sky

Mystery glowing ball streaks through skies above Russia: Footage of unidentified object was capture close to site of the most powerful meteor explosion in recent history that landed with the force of 185 Hiroshima bombs

  • A mysterious ‘UFO’ was observed firing across the sky in remote central Russia 
  • The bright light looked like it was headed for a collision with the Earth’s surface 
  • It was observed a few hundred miles from a famous explosion site 111 years ago  
  • No crash has been reported and no debris has been retrieved from any landing
  • e-mail

9

View
comments

A mystery glowing ball was spotted streaking across the Russian night sky close to the site of the largest meteor explosion in modern history.  

A dashcam captured a dazzling flash changing colour from green to yellow to orange in a remote area of Krasnoyarsk region in Siberia.

It was captured near the impact site of the Tunguska meteor that struck the region with the force of 185 Hiroshima bombs in 1908. 


A dashcam captured a dazzling flash changing colour from green to yellow to orange in a remote area of Krasnoyarsk region in Russia. One theory is that the spectacular luminous UFO streaking over the Siberian hills was caused by a meteor yet so far there is no evidence for it

A witness of the sighting, Pyotr Bondarev from Tura village where the flash was seen, said: ‘The night got bright and warm, as if a giant light bulb was switched on in the sky’.

Experts believe the object seen streaking over the Siberian hills was also a meteor but so far there is no conclusive evidence.

The shining body was also seen as far as 250miles (402km) away, but appeared less, bright.

Witnesses say it appeared to be heading for a crash landing.

No debris from a meteorite has been found so far and experts are keeping an open mind as to what caused the stunning spectacle. 

  • What’s inside a Martian meteorite: X-ray study on rare… Space ROCKS: Expedition bags haul of ‘lost’ meteorites… Twin satellites dubbed Wall-E and Eve fall silent months… Cloudy with a chance of dust storms: NASA’s InSight lander…
  • Touchdown on Mars! Jubilation as NASA’s InSight lander…

Share this article


The latest sighting lies several hundred miles from the site of the monumental Tunguska Event 111 years ago which caused devastation in the region

Mr Bondarev said: ‘It was about 7.30pm, it was dark. I was outside having a walk with my wife and children, when the sky flashed green and yellow.

‘Many people saw it and got very excited.’

Another local source, who spoke to the Siberian Times, said: ‘It’s impossible to tell what the shining object was. It might have been a meteor or something else.’

Some claimed it was a ‘second Tunguska’.


One theory is that the spectacular luminous UFO streaking over the Siberian hills was caused by a meteor yet so far there is no conclusive evidence that anything has landed nearby 


The Tunguska explosion is thought to have been produced by a comet or asteroid hurtling through Earth’s atmosphere at over 33,500 miles per hour (50, 000km/h), resulting in an explosion equal to 185 Hiroshima bombs as pressure and heat rapidly increased

The site of the Tunguska explosion sites is several hundred miles from the site of the monumental Tunguska Event 111 years ago which caused devastation in the region.

More than 770 square miles (2,000 sq km) of forest was wiped out after a fireball – believed to be some 330ft (100m) wide – tore through the atmosphere and exploded, according to scientists.

An estimated 80million trees were destroyed, and there were thousands of charred reindeer carcasses.

It is believed to have exploded three to seven miles above the earth’s surface yet despite the carnage there was no impact crater.

There were no reports of casualties in the sparsely populated area despite an explosion with the force of 185 Hiroshima bombs.


The remote Tura village where the bright light was observed streaking over the Siberian hills in Russia. Tura is a mere few hundred miles from an infamous explosion caused by a meteorite landing over a century ago in the remote forests of Russia that caused devastation 


No debris from a meteorite – a meteor that strikes the ground – has been found so far and experts are keeping an open mind as to what caused the stunning spectacle

However, some experts have disputed the cause of 1908 Tunguska explosion.

On the recent ‘glowing ball’, Krasnoyarsk Kirensky Physics University researcher Sergey Karpov said it was likely a small meteorite.

‘Most likely it was something up to 10 centimetres [4inches] in diameter’,’ he said.

But this has not been confirmed by the Russian emergencies ministry.

There has been no suggestion that a stray missile or debris from a space launch was behind the ‘UFO’ sighting.

WHAT WAS THE CHELYABINSK METEOR STRIKE?

A meteor that blazed across southern Ural Mountain range in February 2013 was the largest recorded meteor strike in more than a century, after the Tunguska event of 1908.

More than 1,600 people were injured by the shock wave from the explosion, estimated to be as strong as 20 Hiroshima atomic bombs, as it landed near the city of Chelyabinsk.

The fireball measuring 18 meters across, screamed into Earth’s atmosphere at 41,600 mph. 

Much of the meteor landed in a local lake called Chebarkul.

Other than the latest find, scientists have already uncovered more than 12 pieces from Lake Chebarkul since the February 15 incident. However, only five of them turned out being real.

What did they find in the meteorites?

Analysis of recovered Chelyabinsk meteorites revealed an unusual form of jadeite entombed inside glassy materials known as shock veins, which form after rock crashes, melts and re-solidifies.

By calculating the rate at which the jadeite must have solidified, the team were able to determine that the asteroid formed after a collision.

Jadeite, which is one of the minerals in the gemstone jade, forms only under extreme pressure and high temperature.

The form of jadeite found in the Chelyabinsk meteorites indicates that the asteroid’s parent body hit another asteroid that was at least 150 metres (490ft) in diameter.

Source: Read Full Article