NHS Covid-19 contact tracking app is finally updated to stop ‘confusing’ ghost notifications that left Britons fearing they had been exposed

  • Update to NHS Covid-19 app is available immediately to iOS and Android users 
  • Will finally get rid of ‘ghost notifications’ that NHS admits were ‘confusing’ 
  • Department of Health claims app will be more accurate following update 
  • Threshold for being deemed at-risk of infection is to be lowered and it is expected more people will be asked to self-isolate

The NHS Covid-19 app has finally received an overdue update to stop users receiving confusing ‘ghost notifications’.

After the app was launched on September 24 it has been downloaded more than 19 million times by people in England and Wales, with 40 per cent of smartphone users installing the app. 

The Department of Health and Social Care also says the update will feature upgrades to how accurate the app is at detecting other users. 

As a result of this and soaring infection rates, more people will be told to self-isolate by the app as the threshold for being deemed a close contact has been lowered.  

Yesterday, Britain announced 24,701 more infections and a further 310 coronavirus victims, up from the 191 posted this time last week.

Scroll down for video 

Pictured, the notification which will follow one of the so-called ‘phantom alerts’. This workaround is designed to quash any concern users may have after receiving the initial notification 

Many users were getting alerts which were ‘default messages’ from Apple and Google, saying ‘Possible COVID-19 exposure’, ‘COVID-19 EXPOSURE LOGGING’ or ‘COVID-19 Exposure Notifications’. Pictured, an example of the phantom notification which was sent out last week 

The app uses bluetooth in the background and anonymously works out if you are likely to have been in contact with someone who tested positive for the coronavirus. 

If they have, people receive a notification from the app telling them they must self-isolate.

However, in the five weeks since it went live users have been receiving mysterious notifications that say ‘COVID-19 EXPOSURE LOGGING’ or ‘COVID-19 Exposure Notifications’.

Coronavirus is spreading fastest in London, according to a study that claims the R rate in the capital is almost as high as three and infections are doubling every three days.

Researchers at Imperial College London, who today estimated a staggering 100,000 people are catching Covid-19 every day across the country, warned the city has a ‘scary’ rate of spread. For comparison, the experts claimed the national R rate is around 1.6 and cases are doubling every nine days.

They predicted the R rate — the average number of people each carrier infects — is higher than two in London, the South East, East and South West, which have mostly escaped any tough local lockdowns. And of the entire south of England, London has the highest prevalence of coronavirus at 0.89 per cent, suggesting more than 80,000 of the city’s nine million residents were infected at any given moment.

Despite causing fear, they were not a warning of infection and were instead revealed to be default notifications from Apple or Google, who built the app framework.

A quick solution was quietly rolled out on October 13 which sent another notification telling users ‘Don’t worry, we have assessed your risk and there is no need to take action at this time.’ 

Now, the NHS has finally admitted the glitch was confusing and the fix was ‘still an inconvenience and cause for concern for some app users.’ 

The update will do away with these misleading and worrisome notifications all together. 

Gaby Appleton, product director at NHS Test and Trace, said: ‘This update builds on that success by increasing accuracy, and also removing ‘ghost’ exposure notifications, meaning users will only be notified if they need to self-isolate.

‘The more people who use the app, the better it works, so I encourage all those who have not yet downloaded the app to do so.’

Another update to the app is a lowering of the threshold for alerts. 

This means the criteria for being deemed a close contact of an infected person is now easier to meet and more people will be asked to self-isolate as a result. 

This, the Doh says, is ‘necessary to break the chain of transmission – helping curb the spread of the virus and therefore ensuring fewer people are infected in the long term’. 

Previously, the checklist was simple, if the app detected you was within two metres of an infected person for at least 15 minutes, you was told to self-isolate. 

According to the Department of Health and Social Care, these parameters resulted in a score of at least 900 on its own algorithm. 

However, this threshold will now be lowered to 120. It remains unknown what a 120 score from the algorithm equates to in reality.  

The app makes use of a phone’s bluetooth to detect how far away others are and also how long they have been within range. 

This was fraught with difficulties and was inconsistent as a result. 

In previous versions of the app some phones were falsely detecting a person who was four metres away and classifying them as a close contact.   

To combat this, Google and Apple have updated their API, the blueprint for dozens of coronavirus tracking apps around the world, including the UK.  

Now, the app sends out a bluetooth ping for four seconds every 3.6 minutes in a similar way to radar or sonar. 

The strength of the signal and how it has changed helps inform the algorithm how far away that person is.  

‘The updated API considers ‘time data’ as well as improved ‘signal-strength’ data,’ the DoH said in a statement. 

‘By considering timing information between successive Bluetooth pings between two devices, we can better estimate change in distance, and so distance itself, in order to improve distance estimation accuracy.’

The updated API also takes into account a third factor when deciding whether or not a person should be told to self-isolate. 

As well as time and distance it now accounts for how infectious a person was at the time of the close contact. 

Patients are widely acknowledged to be at their most infectious at the onset of symptoms and the NHS app now uses when exposure occurred to inform its decision to tell someone they are at risk. 

Other updates are imminent, according to the Department of Health and Social Care, with a November patch intended to allow the NHS app to work seamlessly with users of the separate versions made and used in Scotland, Northern Ireland, Jersey and Gibraltar. 

Leaked SAGE projections made in the summer suggest that under a ‘reasonable worst case scenario’ daily deaths could remain above 500 for three months or more, potentially lasting into March next year

How the NHS Covid-19 app works and the reasons behind some of its flaws

 The NHS contact tracing coronavirus app , called NHS Covid-19, is based on  a piece of software, an API, built by tech giants Apple and Google, who came together in an unprecedented alliance at the start of the pandemic.

It works via Bluetooth, which is fitted to almost every smartphone in the world, and involves a notification system to alert people if they have been in close proximity with someone diagnosed with Covid-19.

Apple and Google let the NHS determine what it deems to be suitable exposure for a a person to be considered at risk for infection. 

The NHS set the limit as within 2m for 15 minutes. 

However, Apple and Google have openly said the app is not perfect, due to the fact Bluetooth is being used for something it was never designed for. 

Therefore, phones with the app installed can struggle to tell exactly how far away another device is. 

Although the threshold is set at 2 metres, it emerged in early trials that people as far away as 4m were told thought by the technology to be less than 2m away. 

Officials say that about 30 per cent of people told to self-isolate may have been more than two metres away from a positive case.

However, they claim most of these cases will be at a distance of 2.1m or 2.2 m, with 4m being a rarity.  

Apple and Google have been aware of this issue since the inception of the project and have recently revealed they have used hundreds of different devices to help calibrate the system. 

It is claimed the NHS app is more accurate than other contact tracing apps around the world which also use the Apple and Google API. 

All the technology for the app is done in the phone itself, and no external servers are used, helping protect user data.

No location or personal data is sent to Apple, Google or the NHS and all interactions between phones are anonymous.

The randomised and untraceable links are only stored for two weeks on the phone itself before being permanently deleted. 

A person can also choose to wipe their data clean, either in the app’s settings or by deleting the app.  

In a conference call this week, representatives from both Google and Apple said the app is not intended to replace manual tracing, but to enhance it. 

They added that, in the tests done in-house during development, 30 per cent of the exposure notifications that were triggered were not picked up by manual contact tracing. 

For a person to receive am infection notification via the app, both they and the infected person must both have had the app at the time of their interaction.

During this interaction, on a bus for example, the phones acknowledge the device has met the 2m/15 min criteria. 

The devices then automatically exchange anonymous ‘keys’ with each other via Bluetooth. The keys randomise and change approximately every 15 minutes. 

If a person then receives a positive test, they receive a unique PIN from the NHS and input this in the app. 

Once they have done this, all the anonymised keys from the phone of the infected person are added to a cloud database. 

Every app is constantly checking in with the same cloud database to see is any of the ‘keys’ it has come into contact with match the keys of positive tests. 

If a person’s phone finds a match, that person then receives a notification informing them they have been exposed and may be infected. 

The app then provides that person with detailed information from the NHS on the next steps. 

The mobile data needed for the app to work is being allowed free of charge in the UK by network carriers and it is believed the app has negligible impact on battery life.    

Source: Read Full Article