Space age bottle of luxury Mann Champagne is made for wealthy tourists in orbit

Space age bottle of luxury Mann Champagne is made so wealthy tourists going into orbit can drink fizz in zero gravity

  • Future space tourists may be able to toast the view with a high-tech bottle of fizz
  • The champagne is being testing during a flight from Reims in France
  • The bottle is aimed at the coming wave of suborbital and orbital space tourism
  • e-mail

View
comments

A champagne bottle has been designed to enable wealthy tourists travelling to space to drink fizz in zero gravity.

Future space tourists will be able to toast the view of the Earth from orbit with a high-tech bottle of Mumm Champagne, the company claims.

The space age bottle is the result of a new collaboration between the Mumm Champagne house and designer Octave de Gaulle.


A champagne bottle has been designed to enable wealthy tourists travelling to space to drink fizz in zero gravity

HOW CAN PEOPLE DRINK CHAMPAGNE IN ZERO GRAVITY?

A champagne bottle has been designed to enable wealthy tourists travelling to space to drink fizz in zero gravity. 

The space age bottle is the result of a collaboration between the Mumm Champagne house and designer Octave de Gaulle.

The Champagne is in the upper portion of the bottle.  

Below that is a finger-controlled valve that uses the Champagne’s carbon dioxide to eject small amounts of wine, which emerges as foam.

Designers had to stop the wine from streaming across the cabin.

In order to do this, Mr De Gaulle created an aluminium strip that forms a ring over the bottle’s top to capture a sphere of bubbly. 

Drinkers can then scoop the wine out of the air using a tiny long-stemmed glass that resembles an egg cup. 

The champagne will be tested during an upcoming flight from Reims, in the heart of France’s Champagne country, today.

A specially-equipped Airbus A300 Zero-G plane (sometimes nicknamed the ‘Vomit Comet’) will make a series of parabolic maneuvers, climbing steeply before plunging down to create 20-second bursts of weightlessness.

Despite undergoing the same zero-gravity training that Nasa requires for its astronauts – the champagne’s target audience is not scientists, as they are not allowed to drink alcohol aboard the International Space Station.

Instead, the bottle is aimed at the forthcoming wave of suborbital and orbital space tourism promoted by private operators like Virgin Galactic and Amazon founder Jeff Bezos’ Blue Origin.

‘They won’t have to be performing any professional tasks on board, so they’ll probably be able to drink a bit of alcohol,’ said astronaut Jean-Francois Clervoy, who heads the company that operates the Airbus Zero-G.

In zero gravity, the challenge is to get wine out of the bottle.

‘You could imagine drinking it with a straw,’ said physicist Gerard Liger-Belair from the University of Reims Champagne-Ardenne, who consulted on the project.

  • Mushrooms could solve the war on plastic: Harnessing the… Can YOU tell which one is real? Creepy AI transfers facial… Children of the 90s rejoice! Original Tamagotchi is making a… Deidre and Ali among names given to the first storms to hit…

Share this article

In search of a more elegant solution, the Mumm team turned to Mr De Gaulle — a great-grand-nephew of the French wartime leader Charles de Gaulle — who came up with a bottle divided into two chambers.

The Champagne is in the upper portion of the bottle.  

Below that is a finger-controlled valve that uses the Champagne’s carbon dioxide to eject small amounts of wine, which emerges as foam.




The space age bottle is the result of a collaboration between the Mumm Champagne house and designer Octave de Gaulle (pictured). The Champagne is in the upper portion of the bottle

However, designers had to find a way to stop the alcoholic foam from streaming across the cabin as soon as it was poured in space.

In order to do this, Mr De Gaulle created an aluminium strip that forms a ring over the bottle’s top to capture a sphere of bubbly.

‘Then you rotate the bottle and the foam sphere is released,’ he said in his Paris workshop.

Drinkers can then scoop the wine out of the air using a tiny long-stemmed glass that resembles an egg cup.

Clervoy said the moment the foam turns to liquid in the mouth is a sensation that can’t be matched on Earth.


The bottle is aimed at the coming wave of suborbital and orbital space tourism promoted by private operators such as Richard Branson’s Virgin Galactic (pictured)

‘It’s really magical because the Champagne lands not just on your tongue but on the palate, the cheeks – the gastronomic sensations are magnified,’ said Professor Clervoy.

Mumm is now looking to partner with a public space agency or one of the private space tourism start-up in order to promote their product.

Mr De Gaulle says he plans to refine his prototype, and may be one day astronauts might be able to ring in a new year while on a mission.

‘There has always been a bit of alcohol in space, even if it’s officially prohibited,’ he said

THE BILLIONAIRE SPACE RACE: THE DETAILS


Jeff Bezos in front of Blue Origin’s space capsule

Jeff Bezos’ space tourism project with Blue Origin is competing with a similar programme in development by Space X, the rocket firm founded and run by Tesla CEO Elon Musk, and Virgin Galactic, backed by Richard Branson.

Bezos revealed in April 2017 that he finances Blue Origin with around $1 billion (£720 million) of Amazon stock each year.

The system consists of a pressurised crew capsule atop a reusable ‘New Shepard’ booster rocket. 

The richest man in the world, Jeff Bezos is pursuing Blue Origin with vigour as he tries to launch his ‘New Glenn’ rocket into low-Earth orbit by 2020.  

Whilst Bezos is yet to leave the atmosphere of Earth, despite several successful launches, Elon Musk’s SpaceX programme has already sent the Falcon Heavy rocket into space.

On February 6 2018, SpaceX sent the rocket towards the orbit of Mars, 140 million miles away. 

On board was a red Tesla roadster that belonged to Musk himself.


Elon Musk with his Dragon Crew capsule

SpaceX have won several multi-million dollar contracts from Nasa as the space agency hopes to use the rockets as a fast-track for its colonisation of the red planet. 

Richard Branson and Virgin Galactic recently successfully conducted a test flight of the Virgin Galactic’s Unity spaceplane.   

The flight accelerated to over 1,400 miles per hour (Mach 1.87).

Calling space ‘tantalisingly close’, Branson also said last year that suborbital space in test flights could be happening by this spring. 

More than 700 affluent customers to date, including celebrities Brad Pitt and Katy Perry, have reserved a $250,000 (£200,000) seat on one of Virgin’s space trips, 

The billionaire mogul also said he expects Elon Musk to win the race to Mars with his private rocket firm SpaceX. 


Richard Branson with the Virgin Galactic craft

SpaceShipTwo will carry six passengers and two pilots. Each passenger gets the same seating position with two large windows – one to the side and one overhead.

The space ship is 60ft long with a 90inch diameter cabin allowing maximum room for the astronauts to float in zero gravity.

A climb to 50,000ft before the rocket engine ignites. Passengers become ‘astronauts’ when they reach the Karman line, the boundary of Earth’s atmosphere, at which point SpaceShipTwo separates from its carrier aircraft, White Knight II.

The spaceship will then make a sub-orbital journey with approximately six minutes of weightlessness, with the entire flight lasting approximately 3.5 hours.  

Source: Read Full Article