Shocking video shows fast-moving river of molten material pouring from Kilauea as ongoing eruption at the Hawaiian volcano sends fountains of lava spewing 160 FEET into the air

  • The ongoing eruption at Kilauea is producing a ‘still-vigorous’ lava flow near the fissure 8 site, USGS says
  • The spatter cone now stands more than 160 feet high, and continues to produce explosive lava fountains
  • Stunning video shows how fast-moving lava has taken over the land near the site as scientists monitor activity
  • e-mail

5

View
comments

Scientists monitoring activity at Hawaii’s erupting volcano have captured dramatic footage of lava pouring across the landscape at roughly 17 miles per hour.

The ongoing eruption at Kilauea is producing a ‘still-vigorous’ lava flow near the fissure 8 site, according to USGS.

Lava continues to spew in fountains from the spatter cone, which now stands more than 160 feet high, and experts warn lightweight fragments of volcanic glass still pose a risk in the region.

Scroll down for video 


Scientists monitoring activity at Hawaii’s erupting volcano have captured dramatic footage of lava pouring across the landscape at roughly 17 miles per hour. The ongoing eruption at Kilauea is producing a ‘still-vigorous’ lava flow near the fissure 8 site, according to USGS

The stunning video shows how fast-moving lava has taken over the land, as explosive events continue to send molten material shooting into the air. 

‘Fissure 8 lava fountains reached as high as about 50 meters (164 feet) during the past day,’ USGS said on Wednesday.

‘The fountain height varies, often sending a shower of lava fragments over the rim of the cone, building it slightly higher and broader.

‘Lava from fissure 8 flows through a well-established channel to the ocean south of Kapoho.’

more videos

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
    • Watch video

      Aerial footage shows river of lava flowing from volcano to ocean

    • Watch video

      University study shows the various health benefits of ASMR

    • Watch video

      Puppies fearless in the face of danger – but only if mum is nearby

    • Watch video

      Footage shows what a Tesla ‘sees’ when in Autopilot mode

    • Watch video

      Pay with your finger: New cards with fingerprint biometrics

    • Watch video

      French priest slaps crying baby during baptism when he won’t calm down

    • Watch video

      Melania Trump tours detention center for immigrant children

    • Watch video

      Spot of turbulence! Couple filmed joining Mile High Club on plane

    • Watch video

      Dedrick D. Williams faces charges for the murder of XXXTentacion

    • Watch video

      Heartbreaking audio of children crying in detention center

    • Watch video

      Police officer dad pulls over daughter’s boyfriend for no reason

    • Watch video

      First Lady Melania Trump visits Texas facility for migrant children


    Lava continues to spew in fountains from the spatter cone, which now stands more than 160 feet high, and experts warn lightweight fragments of volcanic glass still pose a risk in the region

    Last week, breathtaking drone footage captured above Kīlauea revealed the dramatic changes taking place as the Hawaiian volcano continues to spew ash and gas from its summit more than a month into the current eruption.

    The flyover mission led by the US Geological Survey and Office of Aviation Services aimed to investigate the activity within the Halema’uma’u crater, which has been subjected to rapid changes as Kīlauea rumbles with explosions and small earthquakes.


    ‘Lava from fissure 8 flows through a well-established channel to the ocean south of Kapoho,’ USGS says

    As scientists remotely explore the area using unmanned aircraft, the volcano has shown no sign of letting up; on June 14, for example, it launched a plume 6,000 feet above sea level in yet another explosive event. 

    Kīlauea’s summit has been steadily caving in as activity continues, bringing the huge pit crater down with it.

    The footage captured on June 13 shows how the steep crater walls have slumped in toward the center; now, scientist say the deepest part of Halema‘uma‘u sits at about 300 m (1,000 ft) below the crater rim.

    A striking photo of the crater captured just a day earlier shows just how dramatic the collapse has been so far.

    ‘The obvious flat surface is the former Halema‘uma‘u crater floor, which has subsided at least 100 m (about 300 ft) during the past couple weeks,’ USGS explained in a Facebook update last Wednesday.

    ‘Ground cracks circumferential to the crater rim can be seen cutting across the parking lot for the former Halema‘uma‘u visitor overlook (closed since 2008).

    ‘The deepest part of Halema‘uma‘u is now about 300 m (1,000 ft) below the crater rim,’ USGS says.

    That same morning, after a small explosion at the summit, earthquake activity had dipped back down to lower levels for the better part of the day.

    But, by late afternoon, the USGS confirmed it had started to increase again.

    Activity at the lower East Rift Zone in Leilani Estates, which has suffered devastating damages from the current eruption, has continued in the last few days ‘with little change’ as well.


    Scientists have been working around the clock to understand the changes underway as the eruption continues, and assess the ongoing hazards. The map above shows the area of the lava flow in red

    The team previously observed lava fountains spewing 53 meters (174 feet) high from Fissure 8, with the flow continuing to run through the channel to the ocean at Kapoho.

    Scientists have been working around the clock to understand the changes underway as the eruption continues, and assess the ongoing hazards.

    It’s impossible to know precisely how much lava has been produced so far since the volcano began erupting in early May – but the estimates, which USGS says are ‘probably low,’ are staggering.

    The experts say the Fissure 8 vent alone is oozing about 100 cubic meters of lava per second.

    more videos

    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
      • Watch video

        Aerial footage shows river of lava flowing from volcano to ocean

      • Watch video

        University study shows the various health benefits of ASMR

      • Watch video

        Puppies fearless in the face of danger – but only if mum is nearby

      • Watch video

        Footage shows what a Tesla ‘sees’ when in Autopilot mode

      • Watch video

        Pay with your finger: New cards with fingerprint biometrics

      • Watch video

        French priest slaps crying baby during baptism when he won’t calm down

      • Watch video

        Melania Trump tours detention center for immigrant children

      • Watch video

        Spot of turbulence! Couple filmed joining Mile High Club on plane

      • Watch video

        Dedrick D. Williams faces charges for the murder of XXXTentacion

      • Watch video

        Heartbreaking audio of children crying in detention center

      • Watch video

        Police officer dad pulls over daughter’s boyfriend for no reason

      • Watch video

        First Lady Melania Trump visits Texas facility for migrant children


      The flyover mission led by the US Geological Survey and Office of Aviation Services aimed to investigate the activity within the Halema’uma’u crater, which has been subjected to rapid changes as Kīlauea rumbles with explosions and small earthquakes

      WHAT IS THE KILAUEA VOLCANIC ERUPTION?

      The Kilauea volcano on Hawaii’s Big Island has been erupting for more than 30 years but bubbled up in May 2018 after the volcano’s summit rose in the weeks leading up.

      In recent years the volcano has mostly released lava in hard-to-reach areas inside a national park or along the island’s coastline. 

      Lava from the bubbling volcano has now destroyed over 600 homes and forced nearly 2,000 residents to evacuate.

      Researchers have tracked the event since it began but say there is no indication when the destructive lava flow will come to a halt.

      This is partly because scientists are still unsure what started the sudden outpouring of lava. 

      This is the equivalent of about 26,000 U.S. gallons flowing by, or 12 commercial dump trucks driving past per second.

      USGS estimated last week that the current eruption had produced 113.5 million cubic meters of lava since May 3.

      ‘That’s enough to fill 45,400 Olympic-sized swimming pools, cover Manhattan Island to a depth of 6.5 feet, or fill 11.3 million average dump trucks,’ USGS said on June 7.

      And, given the continued activity at Kīlauea in the days since, those numbers are now undoubtedly much, much higher.

      more videos

      • 1
      • 2
      • 3
        • Watch video

          Aerial footage shows river of lava flowing from volcano to ocean

        • Watch video

          University study shows the various health benefits of ASMR

        • Watch video

          Puppies fearless in the face of danger – but only if mum is nearby

        • Watch video

          Footage shows what a Tesla ‘sees’ when in Autopilot mode

        • Watch video

          Pay with your finger: New cards with fingerprint biometrics

        • Watch video

          French priest slaps crying baby during baptism when he won’t calm down

        • Watch video

          Melania Trump tours detention center for immigrant children

        • Watch video

          Spot of turbulence! Couple filmed joining Mile High Club on plane

        • Watch video

          Dedrick D. Williams faces charges for the murder of XXXTentacion

        • Watch video

          Heartbreaking audio of children crying in detention center

        • Watch video

          Police officer dad pulls over daughter’s boyfriend for no reason

        • Watch video

          First Lady Melania Trump visits Texas facility for migrant children

        Source: Read Full Article