World War II bunker used by ‘Churchill’s secret army’ who were ordered to fight to the death in the event of a Nazi invasion is discovered in Scotland

  • Forest worker spotted a tin roof sprouting from the ground in Scotland 
  • Experts found that it leads to one of hundred bunkers used by Britain’s army
  • It was home to ‘Churchill’s secret army’ during World War II
  • This group were trained in guerrilla warfare and would go on suicide missions 

A long-lost bunker used by Great Britain’s most secretive military forces during World War II has been discovered in southern Scotland.

The elite unit, known as ‘Churchhill’s secret army’, were trained in guerrilla warfare and ordered to fight to the death in the event of a Nazi invasion.

Forestry workers in south Edinburg uncovered the structure that is buried four feet underground with a tin roof and brick walls.

The bunker stretches about 23 feet long and is 10 feet wide, and archaeologists believe it housed seven soldiers including bunk beds, a table and cooking stove – the bare necessities needed for a few months stay.

Scroll down for video 

A long-lost bunker used by Great Britain’s most secretive military forces during World War II has been discovered in southern Scotland

Forestry and Land Scotland (FLS) archaeologist Matt Ritchie said: ‘This discovery gives us an insight into one of the most secretive units that were operating during WW2.’

‘It’s quite rare to find these bunkers as their locations were always kept secret – most were buried or lost.’

‘From records, we know that around seven men used this bunker and at the time were armed with revolvers, Sten guns submachine guns, a sniper’s rifle and explosives.’

The Auxiliary Unit, who were also known as ‘scallywags’, were Britain’s ‘secret army’, courageous volunteers prepared to sacrifice their lives to fight against a Nazi invasion of the UK.

The elite unit, known as ‘Churchhill’s secret army’, were trained in guerrilla warfare and ordered to fight to the death in the event of a Nazi invasion

Forestry workers in south Edinburg uncovered the structure that is buried four feet underground with a tin roof and brick walls

The bunker stretches about 23 feet long and is 10 feet wide, and archaeologists believe it housed seven soldiers including bunk beds, a table and cooking stove – the bare necessities needed for a few months stay (pictured is a 3D scan of the bunker)

If wartime church bells rang to warn of enemy invasion, the orders for the Auxiliary Unit volunteers were to disappear without telling anyone and to report to hidden bases in the countryside.

Each was issued with sealed orders giving a list of potential collaborators, some as senior as county chief constables, who might have to be executed if there was a risk of them helping the Germans.

Most of the volunteers worked in the countryside and were chosen for their knowledge of the local area and ability to use a weapon.

Scraps from furniture was left inside the bunker

Trained at Coleshill, in Oxfordshire, they operated in tight groups and their role was to disrupt and destroy the enemy’s supply chain, kill collaborators and take out strategic targets.

Unable to tell anyone about their activities, they disguised their real mission by pretending to belong to the Home Guard.

Hundreds of bunkers were built around Europe for these soldiers, but the structure in the woods of Scotland was never kept on record – making it a rare and exciting find.

Forestry and Land Scotland survey technician Kit Rodger, one of the men who stumbled upon the bunker, said: ‘It’s quite rare to find these bunkers as their locations were always kept secret – most were buried or lost.

‘From records, we know that around seven men used this bunker and at the time were armed with revolvers, submachine guns, a sniper’s rifle and explosives.’

The bunker was accessed through ha narrow passage that led to the main hatch – there was also an escape hatch that has since been filled in from debris.

The interior is made of iron sheets laid over a cold cement floor, and the main space is approximately 23 feet long and 10 feet wide.

The structure was surveyed in November 2019 using a Trimble TX5 laser scanner, controlled us­ing spherical targets registered to the Ordnance Survey national grid 

In addition to 3D laser scanning, the bunker was comprehensively photographed and a written record created

Both ends of the bunker are unit are brick-built with poured cement roof caps, both with a ‘blast wall’ forming a division from the main bunker space, designed as protection against grenades.

The structure was surveyed in November 2019 using a Trimble TX5 laser scanner, controlled us­ing spherical targets registered to the Ordnance Survey national grid. In addition to 3D laser scanning, the bunker was comprehensively photographed and a written record created.

The bunkers were originally nothing more than holes in the ground dug by the scallywags themselves.

But, at the start of 1941, Royal Engineers improved the bases by constructing Nissen huts which had wood, concrete or bare floors and were roofed with a half-cylinder of corrugated iron.

Reasonably well-ventilated, they were furnished with wooden bunk-beds, basic cooking equipment, and chemical toilets.

The bunker was discovered in the wooded country side of south Edinburgh in Scotland

‘We will fight them on the beaches’: Churchill’s most famous wartime speeches

Winston Churchill’s rousing speeches inspired a nation and played a key role in Britain’s morale during the dark early days of the Second World War.

It was a time when the country was almost at its knees, with men dying and morale sinking.

But Churchill’s defiant and powerful words allowed ordinary Britons, soldiers, sailors and airmen to feel hope.

He replaced Neville Chamberlain as Prime Minister on May 10 1940. 

Days earlier, the ‘phoney war’, the period of relative calm following the declaration of war on September 3, 1939, had ended with the German invasion of France, Belgium and Holland.

Churchill’s first speech as premier to the House of Commons, three days later, would go down in history as one of his most famous. 

Winston Churchill delivers a rousing speech during the dark days of WWII

He said: ‘I would say to the House, as I said to those who have joined this government: ‘I have nothing to offer but blood, toil, tears and sweat.’

‘We have before us an ordeal of the most grievous kind. We have before us many, many long months of struggle and of suffering.

‘You ask, what is our policy? I can say: It is to wage war, by sea, land and air, with all our might and with all the strength that God can give us; to wage war against a monstrous tyranny, never surpassed in the dark, lamentable catalogue of human crime. That is our policy.

‘You ask, what is our aim? I can answer in one word: It is victory, victory at all costs, victory in spite of all terror, victory, however long and hard the road may be; for without victory, there is no survival.

‘Let that be realised; no survival for the British Empire, no survival for all that the British Empire has stood for, no survival for the urge and impulse of the ages, that mankind will move forward towards its goal.

‘But I take up my task with buoyancy and hope. I feel sure that our cause will not be suffered to fail among men. At this time, I feel entitled to claim the aid of all, and I say, ‘Come then, let us go forward together with our united strength.’ ‘

 Extract from his first broadcast as PM to the country on May 19, 1940.

‘I speak to you for the first time as Prime Minister in a solemn hour for the life of our country, of our Empire, of our allies, and, above all, of the cause of freedom . . .

‘It would be foolish . . . to disguise the gravity of the hour. It would be still more foolish to lose heart and courage or to suppose that well-trained, well-equipped armies numbering three or four millions of men can be overcome in the space of a few weeks, or even months…

‘Side by side, unaided except by their kith and kin in the great Dominions and by the wide empires which rest beneath their shield — side by side, the British and French peoples have advanced to rescue not only Europe but mankind from the foulest and most soul-destroying tyranny which has ever darkened and stained the pages of history.

‘Behind them — behind us, behind the armies and fleets of Britain and France — gather a group of shattered states and bludgeoned races: the Czechs, the Poles, the Norwegians, the Danes, the Dutch, the Belgians — upon all of whom the long night of barbarism will descend, unbroken even by a star of hope, unless we conquer, as conquer we must; as conquer we shall.

‘Today is Trinity Sunday. Centuries ago, words were written to be a call and a spur to the faithful servants of truth and justice, ‘Arm yourselves, and be ye men of valour, and be in readiness for the conflict; for it is better for us to perish in battle than to look upon the outrage of our nation and our altar. As the Will of God is in Heaven, even so let it be.’ ‘

Extract from his Commons speech on June 4, 1940, after the evacuation of 338,000 Allied troops from Dunkirk.

‘I have, myself, full confidence that if all do their duty, if nothing is neglected, and if the best arrangements are made, as they are being made, we shall prove ourselves once again able to defend our island home, to ride out the storm of war, and to outlive the menace of tyranny, if necessary for years, if necessary alone.

‘At any rate, that is what we are going to try to do. That is the resolve of His Majesty’s Government — every man of them. That is the will of Parliament and the nation. The British Empire and the French Republic, linked together in their cause and in their need, will defend to the death their native soil, aiding each other like good comrades to the utmost of their strength.

‘Even though large tracts of Europe and many old and famous states have fallen or may fall into the grip of the Gestapo and all the odious apparatus of Nazi rule, we shall not flag or fail.

‘We shall go on to the end, we shall fight in France, we shall fight on the seas and oceans, we shall fight with growing confidence and growing strength in the air, we shall defend our island, whatever the cost may be, we shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on the landing grounds, we shall fight in the fields and in the streets, we shall fight in the hills; we shall never surrender, and even if, which I do not for a moment believe, this island or a large part of it were subjugated and starving, then our Empire beyond the seas, armed and guarded by the British Fleet, would carry on the struggle, until, in God’s good time, the New World, with all its power and might, steps forth to the rescue and the liberation of the old.’

Extract from his Commons speech on June 18, 1940.

‘What General Weygand [the French Allied commander] called the Battle of France is over. I expect that the Battle of Britain is about to begin.

‘Upon this battle depends the survival of Christian civilisation. Upon it depends our own British life, and the long continuity of our institutions and our Empire. The whole fury and might of the enemy must very soon be turned on us.

‘Hitler knows that he will have to break us in this island or lose the war. If we can stand up to him, all Europe may be free and the life of the world may move forward into broad, sunlit uplands.

‘But if we fail, then the whole world, including the United States, including all that we have known and cared for, will sink into the abyss of a new Dark Age made more sinister, and perhaps more protracted, by the lights of perverted science.

‘Let us therefore brace ourselves to our duties, and so bear ourselves that, if the British Empire and its Commonwealth last for a thousand years, men will still say, ‘This was their finest hour.’ ‘

 

Source: Read Full Article