Covid cases rise by 15 per cent to 34,950 today as deaths increase to 133 – up by 9.9% on last week

  • Department of Health bosses posted 34,950 cases today, up 15.3 per cent on last Saturday’s figure of 30,301
  • Deaths within 28 days of a positive coronavirus test also increased by 9.9 per cent to 133 today 
  • Hospitalisations jumped by 8.7 per cent to 817 on Tuesday from 755 recorded  the previous week

Britain’s upturn in Covid cases continued today with daily infections rising by more than 15 per cent on last week.

Department of Health bosses posted a further 34,950 coronavirus cases today, up 15.3 per cent on last Saturday’s figure of 30,301. It was the fourth day in the row to see infections rise week-on-week.

The number of victims losing their lives to the virus also increased, with 133 people dying within 28 days of a positive test today. The figure was up 9.9 per cent on last week.

And hospitalisations jumped by 8.7 per cent to 817 on Tuesday — the latest date data is available for — from 755 the previous week.

The figures come after a public health boss told people in the South of England to self-isolate if they have Covid symptoms even if they have tested negative in confusing new advice months after the country was paralysed by the ‘pingdemic’.

Several patients in Bath, Bristol and Swindon tested negative on a PCR test after a lateral flow test returned a positive result mystifying health experts.

PCR tests are far more accurate than lateral flow tests with only 2.8 per cent returning a false result, which are available free over the counter.

Natural Covid infection produces a stronger secondary immune response than the vaccine, a study has claimed. 

Important components of the body’s immune response called memory B cells continue to evolve and get stronger for at least several months, producing highly potent antibodies that can neutralise new variants of the virus. 

By comparison, vaccine-induced memory B cells are less robust, evolving for only a few weeks and never ‘learning’ to protect against variants. 

Covid vaccines do induce more antibodies than the immune system does after a coronavirus infection. 

But the immune system response to infection appears to outshine its response to vaccines when it comes to memory B cells. 

Regardless of whether antibodies are induced by infection or vaccine, their levels drop within six months in many people. 

But memory B cells stand ready to produce new antibodies if the body encounters the virus. 

It comes as:

  • A study found the Delta Covid variant does not appear to cause more severe disease in children than earlier forms of the virus;
  • Research suggested natural Covid infection produces a stronger secondary immune response than the vaccine;
  • Figures revealed Peru has the highest Covid death rate in the world with more than 6,000 per million losing their lives to the deadly virus;
  • Government ministers were said to be considering scrapping the expensive and controversial hotel quarantine programme;
  • A French study claimed Covid did not originate in an infamous south Chinese bat cave at the centre of the ‘lab leak’ theory; 
  • Shocking data showed fraudsters have tricked victims out of more than £2billion during the pandemic. 

Government data up to October 8 shows that of the 94,268,267 Covid jabs given in the UK, 49,132,678 were first doses, a rise of 30,944 on the previous day.

Some 45,135,589 were second doses, an increase of 28,404.

Today’s figures showed a total of 18 coronavirus-linked deaths have been recorded in the last 24 hours, two more than the day before.

The Scottish Government data released on Saturday confirmed 2,417 new positive cases, 210 fewer than Friday’s figures.

The figures from Friday show there were 31,935 new tests, of which 8.1% were positive, up from 7.9% the previous day.

A total of 943 people are in hospital with recently confirmed Covid-19, down 47 in 24 hours. Some 61 are in intensive care, down three.

The daily figures also show 4,246,101 people have received their first dose of a Covid-19 vaccination and 3,859,839 have received a second dose.

Cases in Bath and North East Somerset per 100,000 population over a seven-day period

Delta Covid variant does NOT cause more severe disease in children than earlier strains, study finds 

The Delta variant does not appear to cause more severe disease in children than earlier forms of the virus. 

Earlier this year, the research team found the Alpha variant of the virus did not appear to make children sicker than the original form of the virus, first seen in China. 

New data suggests that youngsters also do not get any sicker from Delta than they did from Alpha. 

Researchers compared two groups of school-age children with Covid in England.

They looked at 694 children infected with the Alpha variant between late December 2020 and early May 2021, and 706 infected with Delta between late May and early July. 

The study published in medRxiv ahead of peer review showed children infected with Delta had slightly more symptoms. 

But in both groups, very few children needed to be hospitalised and long periods of illness were uncommon. 

In both groups, half of the children were sick for no more than five days. 

 

It comes after a public health boss told people in the South of England to self-isolate if they have Covid symptoms even if they have tested negative

Becky Reynolds, director of public health for Bath and North East Somerset Council, said: ‘If thinking it through there is quite a chance you have Covid, even if the PCR is coming back negative, then regard it as Covid and self-isolate.

‘The advice is also to think about your local situation, do an individual risk assessment… so what is the likelihood that even though the PCR is negative, that you may still have Covid?’

The anomalous results were primarily reported in Bath, Bristol and Swindon, the UK Health Security Agency said, adding it was investigating the issue and that it did not appear technical issues had caused the problem. 

Reynolds admitted to the BBC it was a ‘confusing’ situation for people but asked for patience while an investigation into the testing anomalies takes place. 

An Independent Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) member has called for an investigation to be conducted ‘seriously and rapidly’. 

Meanwhile chief medical advisor for the UK Health Security Agency, Susan Hopkins, urged people to make sure they read testing instructions to avoid incorrect readings. 

Dr Lucy Pocock, a GP from Cadbury Heath Healthcare in south Gloucestershire, raised concerns over the issue after seeing a ‘stream of patients’ who had received negative PCR results but positive lateral flow tests.

She told the BBC: ‘The worrying thing here is that these people are all clearly symptomatic and with a very unexpected negative PCR result.’   

‘Several of these patients have done multiple lateral flow tests, all positive, and have then rightly gone on to do a PCR test, which has come back negative.

Medics have raised concerns people are unwittingly spreading Covid-19 because of the testing confusion.     

Source: Read Full Article