Jessica Krug, the white college professor who faked being black, started out as a politically active student at one of Kansas City’s most prestigious schools and once tried to organize a flag-burning event, the mayor of Kansas City, a former classmate, told The Post on Friday.

“I am very surprised that a Jewish girl I knew from Kansas City has gone [on] to be a purported black woman from The Bronx,” said Mayor Quinton Lucas, who attended The Barstow School with Krug in the 1990s.

“She identified fully as white and Jewish. We didn’t even have that many black people at my high school,” Lucas, who is black, continued.

Krug outted herself as a race-faker in a viral Medium post Thursday, confessing she has been pretending to be black for years. She’s a 2020 version of Rachel Dolezal, a white NAACP leader who was outed for pretending to be black in 2015.

Lucas told The Post that he was in a political club with Krug and called her a “pretty strident political participant.”

“She gave a talk in an assembly about hosting a gay prom, which in the late 1990s, which in middle America, would have been very different for us, so I actually appreciated that,” Lucas said.

She also tried to organize a flag-burning event, he said.

“In no way knowing her back then would I have thought that she would be one who either passed or attempted to pass for black,” Lucas said.

“She was always what one would consider to be an activist. I never knew her to go to this level of extreme to misrepresent who she is.”

Krug attended the pricey private school, which charges between $15,000 and $22,000 a year, from eighth to eleventh grade, but she didn’t graduate from the institution, a rep for Barstow confirmed.

The mayor said he was not “angry” over Krug’s choices and instead felt sorry for her.

“If she felt she had to live that kind of lie, there must have been something deeper going on … I’m praying for her,” Lucas said.

“As someone who was from Kansas City, it makes me a bit sad because you can be woke and from Middle America. You don’t have to make up that you’re from The Bronx and there is some unique African American experience that only exists in a place. That black experience existed in her hometown, too. … I don’t know why she felt the need to reject that.”

Krug was unable to be reached for comment.

Share this article:

Source: Read Full Article