The New York City Ballet is off the hook in a scandalous lawsuit claiming explicit photos and lewd messages involving ballerinas were shared among male dancers — though a case against the ex-dancer at the center of the scandal may continue, a judge has ruled.

Alexandra Waterbury — a one-time student dancer at the NYCB — brought the explosive claims in 2018 against the ballet company and her ex-boyfriend and principal dancer Chase Finlay after he allegedly sent pictures he secretly took of her to other male dancers.

Waterbury claimed in the suit that there was a culture of sexual exploitation at the ballet that allowed for Finlay and three others — who are also named as defendants in the case — to exchange lewd messages about ballerinas.

But Manhattan Supreme Court Justice James D’Auguste tossed 19 of the 20 claims in the suit — many of which were against the NYCB, dancers Zach Catazaro and Amar Ramasar, and one-time ballet benefactor Jared Longhitano — finding they couldn’t be held responsible for Finlay sharing the photos.

One claim against Finlay — who resigned from the company in 2018 — for sending the photos can proceed, the judge ruled, calling his actions “deplorable.”

“Finlay, as the creator of the explicit content, is a covered recipient as he gained possession of and had access to an intimate image of Waterbury,” D’Auguste’s decision read. “It is undisputed that Waterbury did not consent to the distribution of her image and that she is identifiable in at least some of the images.”

Longhitano — a one-time member of the New York City Ballet’s Young Patrons Circle — was accused in Waterbury’s suit of once sending a text message to Finlay suggesting they tie up “girls” so they could “abuse them like farm animals.”

Ramasar and Catazano were both fired amid the claims — only to be ordered reinstated by an arbitrator in April 2019. Ramasar said at the time he would return to the NYCB while Catazaro didn’t take his job back.

Waterbury’s lawyer Jordan Merson highlighted that the judge told the NYCB in the decision to consider training, policies and procedures to stop this kind of thing from happening and noted the judge called Finlay’s actions “deplorable.”

“We do not agree with the Court’s interpretation of the law,” Merson said adding that “New York State civil law is inadequate to protect against this type of conduct.”

“We are reviewing the options for proceeding, and Ms. Waterbury will continue to fight to protect New Yorkers,” Merson said.

Longhitano’s lawyer Adam Silverstein told The Post, “The court made the decision we all anticipated. Plaintiff was basically blown out of the water.”

Catazaro’s lawyer Brian Kennedy said, “The judge’s decision dismissing the case correctly ruled that Ms. Waterbury should not have pointed a finger of blame at Mr. Catazaro, and that Mr. Catazaro caused no harm to Ms. Waterbury.

“Mr. Catazaro never obtained or disseminated any nude photos of Ms. Waterbury.”

Ramasar’s lawyer Lance Gotko declined to comment.

A lawyer for the NYCB didn’t immediately return a request for comment.

Share this article:

Source: Read Full Article