Costco and Asda shelves stripped bare in panic-buying frenzy as Tesco boss insists there’s enough to keep Britain fed during coronavirus outbreak (but still rations toilet roll, tinned veg and pasta)

  • Shoppers are flocking to supermarkets to buy bottled water and toilet roll
  • Shelves in Asda in Dagenham, Essex were left completely empty
  • People in Costco in Totteham, north London, pounced on a pallet of large packs of toilet rolls and cleared it in less than a minute
  • Locals were filmed jostling at a Savers supermarket as they emptied shelves
  • Tesco chairman John Allan tried to calm fears, insisting there was enough food in the supply chain 
  • Coronavirus symptoms: what are they and should you see a doctor?

Worried shoppers are stripping Britain’s supermarket shelves bare as Tesco rations the sales of some products while insisting there is enough food keep Britain fed during the coronavirus outbreak.

Panic-buying has swept through the country with shoppers recording empty shelves in supermarkets including Asda, Costco and Tesco.

In Tottenham, north London, Costco customers queued by the dozen with trolleys packed with essentials including toilet roll, nappies and mineral water.

Worried shoppers are stripping Britain’s supermarket shelves bare as Tesco rations the sales of some products while insisting there is enough food keep Britain fed during the coronavirus outbreak. Pictured: Costco in Tottenham, north London

Panic-buying has swept through the country with shoppers recording empty shelves in supermarkets including Asda, Costco and Tesco (above)

In Dagenham, Essex, Asda had almost completely sold out of dried good such as pasta and rice. Long-life milk and sauces for pasta were almost all gone

In Dagenham, Essex, Asda had almost completely sold out of dried good such as pasta and rice. Long-life milk and sauces for pasta were almost all gone.

In Boots, bottles of children’s paracetamol Calpol are only being sold one at a time. 

The surge in panic buying has led Britain’s biggest supermarket Tesco to ration the sale of essential products to five packs at a time.

These are: anti-bacterial products, dried pasta, tinned vegetables, toilet paper and tissues.

However Tesco chairman John Allan has insisted that Britain’s supermarkets will be able to keep the country fed through the coronavirus crisis.

He told BBC Radio: ‘There’s plenty of product in the supply chain, there’s plenty of food at Tesco and other supermarkets, and I don’t think anybody needs to panic buy.

‘We, and I’m sure our competitors, are re-filling our supply chains as rapidly as ever we can.’

Panic-buying has prompted toilet roll companies, such as this one in Manchester, to operate at full capacity

The surge in panic buying has led Britain’s biggest supermarket Tesco to ration the sale of essential products to five packs at a time. These are: anti-bacterial products, dried pasta, tinned vegetables, toilet paper and tissues

However Tesco chairman John Allan has insisted that Britain’s supermarkets will be able to keep the country fed through the coronavirus crisis

He told BBC Radio: ‘There’s plenty of product in the supply chain, there’s plenty of food at Tesco and other supermarkets, and I don’t think anybody needs to panic buy. ‘We, and I’m sure our competitors, are re-filling our supply chains as rapidly as ever we can’

The British Retail Consortium (BRC), which represents most of Britain supermarkets, said the panic-buying had reached levels normally seen at Christmas.

BRC Chief Executive Helen Dickinson OBE said: ‘Retailers are currently facing a rise in demand for certain products unprecedented outside of the Christmas period.

‘However, this largely limited to hygiene and longer shelf-life food products.’

She added: ‘Our members are working hard to ensure consumers have access to the products they need.

‘Even where there are challenges, retailers are well-versed in providing effective measures to keep retail sites running smoothly, and they are working with suppliers to increase the supply of goods.

The British Retail Consortium (BRC), which represents most of Britain supermarkets, said the panic-buying had reached levels normally seen at Christmas

BRC Chief Executive Helen Dickinson OBE said: ‘Retailers are currently facing a rise in demand for certain products unprecedented outside of the Christmas period. ‘However, this largely limited to hygiene and longer shelf-life food products’

Source: Read Full Article