Culinary student, 20, whose jaw ‘wouldn’t stop growing’ shares before-and-after pictures of his incredible transformation following surgery

  • Arthur Cederborg, from Stockholm, Sweden, developed prognathism in puberty
  • His lower jawbone was misaligned and elongated, causing a severe underbite
  • Left with a highly desirable, defined jawline after corrective surgery last winter

A 20-year-old culinary student who suffered from a severe underbite has revealed his incredible transformation after receiving corrective surgery.

Arthur Cederborg, from Stockholm, Sweden, struggled with confidence issues as a teenager after developing prognathism during puberty.

The condition is an extension or bulging out of the jaw, which occurs when the teeth are not properly aligned due to the shape of the face bones. 

In Mr Cederborg’s case, his lower jawbone was misaligned and elongated, causing a severe underbite and crooked teeth.

He was recommended for surgery during a routine trip to his dentist in 2017 and underwent the procedure at Stockholm’s prestigious Karolinska Institute last winter.

Mr Cederborg now has a highly desirable, defined jawline after the operation, which saw medics detach his jaw from his face and reposition the bone. 

He said: ‘When I was born my jaw was already slightly larger but during puberty it was very tough, my jaw just kept growing.

‘I have always had confidence issues which peaked at the age of 15 due to my extra large jaw but now I’m over the moon with how it looks.’


Arthur Cederborg, a 20-year-old student from Stockholm, Sweden, before and after surgery to correct his severe overbite

Mr Cederborg has been left with a highly desirable, defined jawline after the operation saw medics detach his jaw from his face and reposition the bone

He struggled with confidence issues throughout his teenage years after developing prognathism during puberty. The condition is an extension or bulging out of the jaw, which occurs when the teeth are not properly aligned due to the shape of the face bones

Mr Cederborg, who studies culinary art at Stockholm University, said he was ready to start dating now that he had overcome the ‘mental blockade’ his condition caused. 

‘I am currently single, I have not really been a big dater in the past due to confidence issues,’ he added.

Prognathism is an extension or protrusion of the lower jaw.

It occurs when the teeth are not properly aligned due to the shape of the face bones. The condition affects fewer than 1 per cent of the population. 

An extended jaw can be part of a person’s normal face shape that is present at birth.

It can also be caused by other conditions, such as Crouzon syndrome, in which there is premature fusion of the fibrous joints (sutures) between certain bones of the skull. 

Prognathism may develop over time in children or adults as the result of excess growth in conditions such as gigantism. 

‘My jaw certainly has been a mental blockade for dating so now that it’s out the way, who knows for the future.’

He underwent a procedure known as bilateral sagittal split osteotomy on November 6 at the Karolinska Institute, a research-led medical university.

The surgery was recommended to him after a routine trip to the dentist. 

He said: ‘I visited my dentist in 2017 who informed me it should have ideally happened a lot earlier but that it would be wise to get it done now.

‘The wait until I was able to get the surgery was a long process.’  

Despite being deemed a cosmetic procedure, the £5,000 surgery was covered by Sweden’s universal health system. 

During the 30-minute operation, medics carefully cut on both sides of his jaw to separate it from his face before moving it backwards to the correct position.  

He was also given braces to straighten his lower set of teeth. 

Mr Cederborg said: ‘The recovery process initially took about two weeks before the swelling went down and around a month for the scarring to begin to fade away.

‘There is no pain now, I was very lucky with the recovery. This was a reconstruction as well as cosmetic procedure, and I had no health problems prior.

‘Some people experience ongoing pain and numbness after the procedure, but I didn’t really experience any of this. It was a reality smooth healing process.

‘It is usually an expensive procedure but thankfully Sweden’s universal health system was able to cover the cost.’

Prognathism, which affects fewer than 1 per cent of the population, can be genetic or occur when the jaw grows wrongly in the womb or during childhood.

It can also be the result of other syndromes or conditions that impact bone development.

Mr Cederborg, who studies culinary art at Stockholm University, said he was ready to start dating now that he had overcome the ‘mental blockade’ his condition caused

He was recommended for surgery during a routine trip to the dentist in 2017 and underwent the procedure at Stockholm’s prestigious Karolinska Institute last winter

During the 30-minute operation, medics carefully cut on both sides of his jaw to separate it from his face before moving it backwards to the correct position. He was also given braces to straighten his lower set of teeth

Source: Read Full Article