Sue Perkins, 53, reveals she has ADHD and admits that ‘everything has made sense to her’ since she received her diagnosis

Sue Perkins has revealed has attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

The former Great British Bake Off host, 53, made the revelations in a response to a Twitter post by Gomez guitarist Tom Gray, who admitted that he was ‘creeping’ towards his own diagnosis of the disorder.

Sharing her own experience, Sue told Tom that once she had been diagnosed, ‘everything made sense’ to her.

Health update: Sue Perkins has revealed has attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)

Musician Tom had opened up on the affect his undiagnosed condition was having,  writing on his page: ‘I’m creeping towards an ADHD diagnosis. Strongly advised to do it to help me but more likely help people who have relationships with me. 

‘Never realised before how object permanence is such a problem for me. Staying in touch rarely if ever occurs to me. I can only apologise. x.’

To which Sue responded sharing her own experience, telling him: ‘I have fully crept. Once I had the diagnosis, suddenly everything made sense – to me and those who love me. Wishing you well on the journey, Tom x.’

News: The former Great British Bake Off host, 53, made the revelations in a response to a Twitter post by Gomez guitarist Tom Gray, who admitted that he was ‘creeping’ towards his own diagnosis of the disorder

Opening up: Sharing her own experience, Sue told Tom that once she had been diagnosed, ‘everything made sense’ to her

Tom went on to thank Sue for her words, with his post met with other comments from followers sharing their own journeys with the condition.  

ADHD is a mental disorder that affects behaviour. People with the condition feel restless, may have trouble concentrating and can act impulsively.

The exact cause is unknown, but the condition has been shown to run in families. 

Most cases are diagnosed in children between three and seven years old, but sometimes it is diagnosed later in childhood.

Candid: Musician Tom had opened up on the affect his undiagnosed condition was having, writing on his page: ‘I’m creeping towards an ADHD diagnosis. Strongly advised to do it to help me but more likely help people who have relationships with me’

Response: ‘I have fully crept. Once I had the diagnosis, suddenly everything made sense – to me and those who love me. Wishing you well on the journey, Tom x’

People with ADHD may also have additional problems such as sleep and anxiety disorders.

It comes after Sue revealed that she was diagnosed with a benign brain tumour in 2015.

The TV presenter didn’t realise she was suffering from the condition until she underwent a health screening as part of her show Supersizers. 

And speaking in 2021, Sue – who split from ex Anna Richardson that year – reflected on her pituitary gland tumour diagnosis, which may have affected her ability to have children.

Shock: It comes after Sue revealed that she was diagnosed with a benign brain tumour in 2015

Supersizers: The TV presenter didn’t realise she was suffering from the condition until she underwent a health screening as part of her show Supersizers. Pictured in 2015 with Giles Coren

Sue told The Mirror: ‘I don’t know if I would have gone on to have children. But as soon as someone says you can’t have something, you want it more than anything.’ 

Sue regularly attends hospital check-ups to monitor the symptoms of her tumour.

‘Sometimes it screws up my hormones. I have various tests now to make sure the side effects aren’t too onerous.’ 

Fears: speaking in 2021, Sue – who split from ex Anna Richardson that year – reflected on her pituitary gland tumour diagnosis, which may have affected her ability to have children (pictured with Anna in 2014)

The comedian told the newspaper: ‘I have been through a very, very dark time since the tumour started to make its presence felt. ‘

A benign brain tumour is a mass of non-cancerous cells that grow relatively slowly in the brain, according to The NHS. 

Sue’s tumour is on the pituitary gland in her brain, which is the gland responsible for releasing hormones into the bloodstream.  

WHAT IS ADHD?

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a behavioural condition defined by inattentiveness, hyperactivity and impulsiveness.

It affects around five per cent of children in the US. Some 3.6 per cent of boys and 0.85 per cent of girls suffer in the UK. 

Symptoms typically appear at an early age and become more noticeable as a child grows. These can also include:

  • Constant fidgeting 
  • Poor concentration
  • Excessive movement or talking
  • Acting without thinking
  • Little or no sense of danger 
  • Careless mistakes
  • Forgetfulness 
  • Difficulty organising tasks
  • Inability to listen or carry out instructions 

Most cases are diagnosed between six and 12 years old. Adults can also suffer, but there is less research into this.

ADHD’s exact cause is unclear but is thought to involve genetic mutations that affect a person’s brain function and structure.

Premature babies and those with epilepsy or brain damage are more at risk. 

ADHD is also linked to anxiety, depression, insomnia, Tourette’s and epilepsy.  

There is no cure. 

A combination of medication and therapy is usually recommended to relieve symptoms and make day-to-day life easier. 

Source: NHS Choices 

Source: Read Full Article