A professor at the University of Idaho is fighting back against a TikTok sleuth who accused her of horrifically murdering the four students!

As you know, Xana Kernolde, Ethan Chapin, Madison Mogen, and Kaylee Goncalves were stabbed to death in their off-campus home in Moscow, Idaho, on November 13. More than a month since their deaths, the Moscow Police Department has not arrested anyone or even named a suspect in connection to the quadruple homicide. Naturally, with the murders remaining unsolved, people have been trying to piece together on social media who is potentially responsible for this crime. But one person’s sleuthing took things way too far — as they’re now being sued for defamation by a University of Idaho professor!

According to NBC News, Rebecca Scofield – an associate professor and the chair of the history department at the school – filed a lawsuit in Idaho District Court on Wednesday, accusing TikTok user Ashley Guillard of falsely claiming she planned the murders with another student. Per the lawsuit, videos from the social media personality, who solves murder cases by using tarot cards and “performing other readings,” began popping up on the platform on November 24 and have been viewed millions of times.

In the videos, Ashley claimed Rebecca orchestrated the murders because she was involved with one of the victims – allegedly Kaylee. Providing no evidence to back her claims, the TikToker alleged the student was trying to break up with Rebecca in order to “keep from making the relationship public,” KTVB7 reported. Ashley claimed at one point:

“I don’t care what y’all say, Rebeca Scofield killed and she was the one to initiate the plan…”

She didn’t stop there. Ashley went on to say in another video:

“Rebecca Scofield is going to prison for the murder of the 4 University of Idaho students whether you like it or not.”

However, the professor fired back. Rebecca said in the suit that she didn’t even have any of the four victims in her class, and she never met them. In fact, she claimed she was not even in Moscow on the day of the slayings as she was in Oregon with her husband to see some friends. The suit states:

“Professor Scofield has never met Guillard. She does not know her. She does not know why Guillard picked her to repeatedly falsely accuse of ordering the tragic murders and being involved with one of the victims. Professor Scofield does know that she has been harmed by the false TikToks and false statements.”

According to NBC News, Rebecca even asked Ashley to take down the videos, sending a cease and desist letter on November 29. However, she never did and continued to post videos. When Rebecca’s lawyer sent another cease and desist on December 8, Ashley showed the document on TikTok, saying Rebecca would have to “file actual legal documents in a federal court” to ask her to remove it. For a week and a half afterward, Ashley posted 20 more videos falsely accusing her of the crime. Now, the teacher says the accusations have created a ton of emotional distress and damage to her reputation. More than that, she is afraid for her family’s safety:

“She fears that Guillard’s false statements may motivate someone to cause harm to her or her family members.”

In response to the lawsuit, Ashley shared a video on Thursday titled “Rebeca Scofield will regret this lawsuit.” She said in the clip:

“You just don’t get it, I’ve been against people big and small, corporations and giants, systemic policies and racism and won. They all regret coming against me. All of them. Now Rebeca will be added to that list of regretful people.”

#solvingmysteriousdeaths #universityofidahomurder #universityofidaho #unsolvedmysteries #solvedmysteries #rebeccascofield #jackducoeur #moscowpd #kayleegoncalves #madisonmogen #ethanchapin #xanakernodle

♬ original sound – Ashley Solves Mysteries

What the f**k… Clearly, she is not too concerned about this legal battle.

The suit is seeking a jury trial to establish compensation. This is  just wild, Perezcious readers! Reactions to the lawsuit? Let us know in the comments below.

Source: Read Full Article