May the force be with you! Disney shows off a REAL lightsaber that even makes the iconic sound associated with the Jedi weapon in Star Wars

  • Disney demonstrated a real-life lightsaber at SXSW earlier this month
  • The device shot out blue light and made the iconic sound from the films 
  • READ MORE:  Visitors to Disney parks may be able to battle with ‘real’ lightsabers

Disney is making every adult’s childhood dream come true by unveiling a real lightsaber that looks and sounds like the iconic weapon in Star Wars films.

The innovation was demonstrated at SXSW by Disney Parks and Experiences Chairman Josh D’Amaro, who pushed a button on the handheld device and released a glowing blue blade.

The neon-colored shot out of the silver hilt, releasing the well-known sound associated with the Jedi weapon.

Disney has not yet revealed if the device will be available to the public, but many Star Wars fans believe it will be used in the park’s attractions based on the popular films.

D’Amaro took the stage at SXSW, saying: ‘I have the coolest job in the world. I’m holding a real lightsaber.’

Disney Parks and Experiences Chairman Josh D’Amaro brought childhood dreams to life when he demonstrated a real lightsaber earlier this month

He explained that it is one of the lightsabers used onboard Disney’s ultra-expensive Galactic Starcruiser experience, Deadline reports.

Disney has not revealed the technology behind the lightsaber, but the company was awarded a patent in 2018 detailing the potential structure of a similar device.

The patent, titled Sword Device with Retractable, Internally Illuminated Blade, describes a lightsaber hilt working like a motorized tape measure.

At the press of a button, the tapes would extend to a total length several times that of the hilt itself. 

The tapes would also have some kind of LED lighting inside, such that the lightsaber can light up similar to how they appear in the films. 

A lightsaber is the official weapon of the Star Wars series, used by the Jedi, Sith and other Force-sensitives.

In the movies, the device is made of a plasma blade powered by a kyber crystal, a fictional stone.

While the lightsaber in Star Wars can virtually cut through anything, Disney’s innovation is said to be completely safe.


Disney is making dreams come true with the demonstration of a real-life lightsaber earlier this month

 Disney filed another patent in 2015, describing an ‘audience interaction projection system’ that uses drones to send down beams of light towards the audience, who are given ‘faux lightsabers’ to deflect the laser bolts back at the machine

Disney filed another patent in 2015, describing an ‘audience interaction projection system’ that uses drones to send down beams of light towards the audience, who are given ‘faux lightsabers’ to deflect the laser bolts back at the machine.

However, this technology would solely be used for entertainment in Disney parks. 

One of the black and white drawings in the latest patent shows a drone shooting a beam of light towards a figure holding a long, thin device with a handle – similar to one a famous Jedi may have used.

‘A process and system capture the infrared light that is reflected or emitted from a device to precisely locate the device,’ reads the patent published on July 14 and first spotted by Patent Yogi.

A lightsaber is the official weapon of the Star Wars series, used by the Jedi, like Luke Skywalker (pictured), Sith and other Force-sensitives.

‘The process and system project visible light from a light source toward the device such the light precisely target at the device.’

The document continues to create a picture of the area park-goers might witness during their interaction with the technology.

Disney describes filling the air above the audience with particulate matter such as water vapor, condensed water, liquid nitrogen, dust or theatrical fog.

This will prompt the drone to shine visible light through the particulate matter and direct it at the audience member holding the device – giving the effect of what could be a real lightsaber deflecting laser beams. 

Source: Read Full Article