Take a tour of Ireland’s most expensive home: ‘Exceptional’ seven-bedroom house in Dublin is on the market for £11.9million – and video footage of the property shows just why it’s so pricey

  • The house is on Ailesbury Road – the second-most expensive road in the Irish version of Monopoly
  • The beautiful property features a three-hole putting green and an elevator to the first floor 
  • It is described as ‘undoubtedly the finest house located on Dublin’s premier residential road’

A rare opportunity (for the super-rich) has arisen to move into the most expensive home in Ireland – on the market for £11.9million (€14million).

The property is No.73 on Dublin’s Ailesbury Road, the second-most expensive street in the Irish version of Monopoly (after Shrewsbury Road), where former Taoiseach Albert Reynolds used to live and where the embassies for China, Poland and Switzerland are located.

The house, which has seven bedrooms and a three-hole putting green, is described as an ‘exceptional property’ by the real estate firm selling it, Colliers International – with a video tour it made proving the point.  

Pictured above is 73 Ailesbury Road in Dublin, which has come on the market for £11.9million (€14million)

Colliers International real estate says the ‘exceptional property’ is a ‘classical early-20th-century home of elegant proportions’

The new owners of 73 Ailesbury road will have the chance to wine and dine in a grand formal dining room (pictured) 

On the ground floor, there is an entrance hall (pictured) with a fireplace and a formal drawing room

The prospective owners can step into a lift that will sweep them up to the first floor, where lies the master bedroom, with an adjoining dressing room and bathroom suite. 

Each of the property’s six ‘regular’ bedrooms features an en-suite bathroom. 

On the ground floor, there is a fireplace in the entrance hall, and the new owners will have the chance to wine and dine in a grand formal dining room. 

There’s also a formal drawing room, an ‘English style’ kitchen with a pantry, and a breakfast room looking out on the terrace. Visitors can hang their jackets in the guest cloakroom, and shoes can be left in the boot room.

The house is enclosed by manicured gardens, which are likened to a ‘haven for honeybees’ by Colliers International. 

A lavender passageway, embellished with climbing roses and wisteria, cuts through the lawn. The walkway leads to a wooded area with a trickling brook and a rock waterfall, where spring bulbs, bluebells and daffodils are planted underfoot.

The property was designed by Irish architect Rudolf Maximilian Butler and was built circa 1913 

 It is ’undoubtedly the finest house located on Dublin’s premier residential road’, says Marcus Magnier of Colliers International

The new owners can cook in the home’s ‘English style’ kitchen with an adjoining pantry, pictured above 

The prospective owners will step into a lift that will sweep them up to the first floor, where lies the master bedroom (pictured)

Built circa 1913, the one-acre (0.4 hectares) estate was designed by Rudolf Maximilian Butler, an architect best known for his Catholic ecclesiastical works in Ireland. 

Butler made the property his private home, living in the residence from 1924 until 1942.

Estate agents Catherine O’Connor and Marcus Magnier say the property is a ‘superb example of the classical architecture revival of its time’.

Each of the property’s six bedrooms – one of which is pictured – features en-suite bathrooms

The estate agents say the property is a ‘superb example of the classical architecture revival of its time’

The new owners will receive keys to a truly beautiful home, and one with seven bedrooms and a three-hole putting green

According to the estate agents, the property is ‘surrounded by extensive private and secluded manicured gardens’

They add that the ‘imposing grand house’ is ’a classical early-20th-century home of elegant proportions surrounded by extensive private and secluded manicured gardens’. 

It is ’undoubtedly the finest house located on Dublin’s premier residential road’, says Magnier.

What’s more, there is room for the new owners to expand the property, with Lawrence and Long Architects having dreamt up ‘a wonderful concept’ for it.

Architect Joe Lawrence said: ‘The house and the garden to this property are unique and quite special. To substantially increase the size of the house for future needs, it is important to retain this special character. With a considered design, we propose to extend the property to 14,000 sq ft without taking away from its original character. By careful design, this can be achieved, without damaging its existing special qualities.’

The firm’s concept would extend the existing volume of the main house eastwards and add a new basement to the existing footprint.

The design concept extends an area of circa 10,000 sq ft of ‘superb accommodation’ for future needs, to include a multi-functional cinema, wine cellar, 20m swimming pool, sauna, steam room and gym.

A lavender pergola walkway, embellished with climbing roses and wisteria, cuts through the property’s lawn

Colliers likens the property’s manicured gardens to a ‘haven for honeybees’

While 73 Ailesbury Road is currently the most expensive property for sale in Ireland, it’s not a record-breaker.

No. 53 Ailesbury Road, the French ambassador’s residence, was offered for €60m in 2008, according to independent.ie, and an Edwardian residence on Shrewsbury Road fetched £49.2million (€58million) at auction in 2005, setting a new record for the world’s most expensive house per square foot, according to The Guardian. 

Viewing of 73 Ailesbury road is strictly by private appointment with Colliers International. Find more information about the property here. Detailed concept drawings by Lawrence and Long Architects and CGI are available on request.

Source: Read Full Article