Federal agents seized about 1 million pills containing fentanyl during a raid in Inglewood earlier this month, the largest bust of fentanyl pills in the state, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration announced Thursday.

The drugs were found after agents served a search warrant on July 5 at an Inglewood home that investigators believe was a stash house used by a trafficking organization linked to the Sinaloa cartel.

"This massive seizure disrupted the flow of dangerous amounts of fentanyl into our streets and probably saved many lives," Bill Bodner, the special agent in charge of the DEA’s Los Angeles office, said in a statement.

According to the DEA, the fake pills were designed to have the same look, color, shape and size of real prescription drugs. The pills were made to look like other opioid mediations, like oxycodone.

The DEA and Hawthorne Police Department began investigating the organization in May, when agents identified stash houses and drug couriers. That investigation led to the July 5 raid and discovery of the fake pills, which DEA officials believe have a street value of $15 million to $20 million.

The Los Angeles area is considered a major hub for the shipment of drugs across the country because of its proximity to the southern border, airports and docks. Shipments of illegal drugs are often broken up in the area, then taken across the country for distribution.

This story originally appeared in Los Angeles Times.

Source: Read Full Article