Britain's belting weather will continue on Tuesday with no let up in the UK's soaring temperatures for now.

While the glorious sunshine has been welcomed by most the Met Office brought everyone down with a bump on Monday after issuing the country's first ever extreme heat warning.

While the public is used to weather warnings relating to thunderstorms and cold weather the sudden appearance of an amber warning for heat took many off guard.

According to the Met Office the amber warning has been issued due to high temperatures both by "day and night" leading to "public health impacts".

The extreme heat warning began on Monday at 4.05pm and will be in place until Thursday at 11.59pm.

Central and south Wales, the south west, the south of England and the west midlands have all been singled out as areas of concern.

London which has seen the highest temperature of the year so far is not included in the amber warning.

Met Office Chief Operational Meteorologist Steven Ramsdale said: "The high temperatures are going to continue through a large part of this week.

"Many areas will continue to reach heatwave thresholds but the amber extreme heat warning focuses on western areas where the most unusually high temperatures are likely to persist.

"There’s a continuing risk of isolated thundery downpours late in the afternoons but most areas will stay dry until later in the week.

"Temperatures should begin to fall for most areas heading into the weekend, with some more unsettled conditions looking to develop."

On Tuesday and Wednesday many parts of the UK will still continue to push over the 30C threshold.

Come Thursday the mercury highs will begin to lower with many areas seeing temperatures in the mid-20s.

By Friday the weather will be much cooler with temperatures moving back down to manageable levels.

The forecast for weather on Tuesday from the Met Office says: "Good deal of cloud affecting coastal districts in the north, whilst other areas will have a good deal of sunshine and turning hot again across central, southern and western parts.

"Risk of thunderstorms developing over eastern areas of England later."

Source: Read Full Article