Feminist author Naomi Wolf refuses to backdown after being suspended from Twitter for spreading outlandish theories about vaccines and 5G

  • Dr Naomi Wolf claimed she was not a conspiracy theorist despite the Twitter ban
  • Slammed Twitter for de-platforming her and argued she should be able to appeal
  • Was erratic during the interview, making outlandish claims before backtracking
  • Refused to reveal if she had received the jab, said question was inappropriate 
  • She was banned from Twitter last week after calling Dr Anthony Fauci ‘satan’

Feminist author Naomi Wolf has refused to backdown after being suspended from Twitter for spreading outlandish theories about vaccines and 5G. 

Dr Wolf, author of third-wave feminist book The Beauty Myth, said she was not a conspiracy theorist despite the recent ban.  

She slammed Twitter for de-platforming her, arguing the platform should allow people to appeal rather than simply ‘hang up’ on them. 

She added a claim the company has a conflict of interest, because the daughter of Dr Anthony Fauci, the US’s top Covid advisor, allegedly works for the company as a software engineer.   

Dr Wolf said the content she had, until recently, been tweeting would not be great for any investigation into the origins of the Covid-19 or Dr Fauci’s handling of the pandemic.    

Twitter suspended American author Naomi Wolf after she tweeted myths about Covid-19 vaccines and 5G

The American author was suspended after claiming jabs were a ‘software platform that can receive uploads’ in one tweet and later comparing Dr Fauci to ‘satan’ 

She later backtracked and admitted she does not blame Dr Fauci’s daughter for her suspension because she does not ‘have any evidence of that’.

But, she said, ‘it raises the problem with social media platforms that they don’t have journalistic ethics preventing conflict of interest,’ she told the Sunday Times.

She was reportedly erratic during the interview, swinging from making outlandish claims to backtracking, and then becoming defensive. 

She refused to reveal whether she had received the Covid-19 vaccine, saying the question was inappropriate and adding that medical decisions are up to the individual. 

She pointedly suggested she had not had the vaccine, however, making a clear note that jabs are under emergency use authorisation pending full clinical trials.   

The author has claimed to have concerns about 5G radio signals and said she had seen ‘strange group consciousness’ as a result of the new network.   

Dr Wolf also railed against the use of emergency laws, explaining how she used her website Daily Clout to help people understand their freedoms enshrined in US law. 

‘The constitution doesn’t say that if there is a bad infectious disease, you have to suspend the constitution and give tyrannical power to the government’, she told the Sunday Times’ Rosie Kinchen. 

Elsewhere, Dr Wolf sees the pandemic as a crisis for democracies across the globe –  where lawmakers have been unable to meet in person for months, and populations are encourage to wear masks in public.     

In recent months, Dr Wolf has increasingly strayed into conspiracy theory territory, but she is quick to brand people who throw out the term ‘naive’.  

‘I have been in a room where the decisions are made, where various kinds of political power are deployed at a national level, and I am not naive as a result’, she said. 

In recent months, Dr Wolf has increasingly strayed into conspiracy theory territory, but she is quick to brand people who throw out the term ‘naive’

Dr Wolf is currently ‘touring’ American with husband and private detective David O’Shea. 

Last week she spoke to Steve Bannon, the former Donald Trump adviser, for a podcast, and she recently spoke to 60 state legislators in Maine and again in Michigan.   

O’Shea now acts as her unofficial Twitter arm, though Wolf has warned her followers will migrate away from the platform with her.  

Dr Wolf was suspended from Twitter last week after claiming jabs were a ‘software platform that can receive uploads’ in one tweet and later comparing Dr Fauci to ‘satan’. 

Dr Wolf was suspended from Twitter for making outlandish claims about the vaccine

She also tweeted that vaccine passports would ‘recreate a situation that is very familiar to me as a student of history. This has been the start of many, many genocides.’

In another bizarre tweet, Dr Wolf claimed she had spoken to an Apple employee who told her ‘they had new tech to deliver vaccines (with) nanoparticles that let you travel back in time.’ 

The author told her 140,000 followers ‘the best way to show respect for healthcare workers if you are healthy and under 65 is to socialise sensibly and expose yourself to a low viral load.’

And in her most recent post, Dr Wolf said ‘it seems urgent for public health to separate vaccinated people’s urine/faeces from general sewage supplies/waterways’ until studies on their potential contamination of unvaccinated people’s drinking water.  

She also claimed children should not wear masks, tweeting the bizarre claim she was ‘seeing kids with their lower faces hanging inertly, absolutely unmoving facial muscles, when they take their masks off’. 

Twitter said the suspension was permanent and Dr Wolf would not be able to launch an appeal. 

The decision was welcomed by many users whoo said they were pleased to see an end to the ‘dangerous anti-vaxx nonsense’ peddled by Dr Wolf. 

Dr Wolf’s suspension from the platform was welcomed by some users who said she had been banned ‘for being too stupid’

It is the latest in a string of problematic controversies the American author has faced.

Her book, Outrages: Sex, Censorship, and the Criminalisation of Love, was publicly rubbished in 2019 after a BBC investigation found she had made serious research mistakes and misunderstood key legal terms.

Dr Wolf has also been accused of exaggerating the number of deaths from anorexia in her 1990 book The Beauty Myth and of ‘misrepresenting the brain’ in her book Vaginas. 

She also previously claimed the US military imported Ebola from Africa and intended to spread it at home.

Source: Read Full Article