Britain’s charming tributes to a beloved Queen: Children wear Cub uniform and take flowers to school, bus stops emblazoned with late monarch’s image and books of condolence in local churches – so how are YOU paying tribute to Her Majesty?

  • Communities are coming together to commemorate her Majesty, with schools organising flower donations 
  • People making small gestures of respect, such as adding temporary profile pictures of Queen on Facebook
  • Children are writing letters, drawing pictures and going to school in Scout uniforms as a mark of respect
  • Local councils and parish churches are opening books of condolences- some physically and others online
  • How are YOU paying tribute to the Queen? Send your stories and pictures to [email protected] 
  • Full coverage: Click here to see all our coverage of the Queen’s passing

People up and down the country are paying tribute to the Queen, with condolence books in local churches, bus stops emblazoned with regal pictures and schoolchildren ‘reflecting’ on Britain’s longest reigning monarch in special assemblies.

Charming tributes to Her Majesty have poured in, with people trying to commemorate the Queen, who died yesterday after 70 years of service, in any way they can.

Facebook feeds have been overwhelmed by temporary profile pictures of Queen Elizabeth and young children are writing sweet notes to her and her successor, King Charles III.

And anyone travelling to work or school this morning would have been surrounded by photos of Queen Elizabeth on billboards and bus stops, while underground stations had heart-warming hand-written tributes on whiteboards.

One board had a hand-sketched portrait of the Queen, along with the words: ‘You will never be forgotten and the world will fondly remember you with so much respect and love.

‘We half expected you to live forever and to always be wearing the Crown. But now you’re at peace with the love of your life.’

Queen Elizabeth’s portrait can be seen on electronic billboards and bus stops up and down the country. Pictured: Edinburgh’s Princes Street 

Children have been writing handwritten letters to the Queen, with a five-year-old girl drawing this sweet picture of the Queen along with the words ‘I’m so sad you died’

Tearful mourners returned to Buckingham Palace (pictured), Windsor Castle and Balmoral this morning to lay flowers and pay tribute to the Queen 


These siblings have gone to school dressed in Cub and Scout uniforms to pay their respects. On their Twitter account they thanked the Queen for her service, saying: ‘Thank you for everything you did for our country and beyond.’

One mother shared a picture of her daughter who was taking a bouquet of roses into her school, which is organising flower donations to take to the Palace

People travelling to work and school this morning would have been surrounded by heartwarming tributes to the Queen, including this hand-drawn portrait at a London Underground station

Parents have shared on social media pictures of their children’s tributes to the late monarch, with one five-year-old girl drawing a sweet picture of the Queen surrounded by hearts and the words ‘I’m so sad you died’.

Meanwhile, a 7-year-old girl wrote a note to the new King complete with a sketch of both Charles and Elizabeth and the words ‘I am so sorry that happened on Thursday the 8th of September. I hope… you are not sad’.

One mother shared a picture of her young daughter who was taking a bouquet of roses to her school today, which was organising flower donations to take to the Palace.

Another Tweeted that her two children had decided to wear their Scout and Cub uniforms to school as a mark of respect.

And schools around the country have been holding special assemblies to allow children time to reflect on the life of Queen Elizabeth II.

Sir William Borlase’s Grammar School in Buckinghamshire said it had was holding a remembrance service in the Chapel, with the school coming together ‘to remember and give thanks’, and the headteacher of Chappel C of E Primary School in Essex said she would ‘lead a reflective assembly about the life of the Queen’.

Children at the British School of Paris in Croissy-sur-Seine, France also gathered on the sports field to pay tribute.

The Queen’s picture is on electronic bus stop billboards up and down the country. Pictured: a bus stop in Wimbledon, London

Facebook has been flooded with people changing their profile picture temporarily to one of the Queen, like this sketch of her with Paddington Bear

Another underground board read this morning: ‘It is with great sadness that our beloved Queen Elizabeth II has died. Ma’am thank you for your never wavering service’

Schools around the country, and further afield – like the British Junior School of Paris – have been coming together and holding ‘special’ assemblies this morning

Village halls and churches have also tried to unite communities in this time of grief.

Special candle-lit vigils are being held in churches up and down the country, while village halls like one in Penkhull, Stoke-on-Trent have been flying Union Flags at half mast.

Local councils across the UK have set up books for people to write messages of support – some physically and others online.

Cllr James Jamieson, chairman of the Local Government Association, said in a statement: ‘Councils have been proud to serve Her Majesty throughout her reign and will continue to do so by now putting into place local arrangements to support the public in expressing their own sympathies.

‘These arrangements will include the opening of both public and virtual books of condolence, ensuring flags are flown at half mast, and overseeing arrangements for the laying of flowers in public areas.’

Portsmouth City Council, Derby Council, Preston City Council, Nottingham City Council, Lancashire County Council and Glasgow County council are among those who have already set up books for local residents to sign.

Elsewhere, the Church of England website has opened an online memorial book and encourages people to light a virtual candle for the Queen.

The Central Council of Church Bell Ringers also encouraged parishes to open books of condolences as it recommended tolling muffled bells for one hour from noon on Friday.

Birmingham’s St Philip’s Cathedral, Guildford Cathedral and Wakefield Cathedral are among those hosting books of condolence for visitors to sign.

Theatres across the country are also opening books of condolences as well as dimming their lights, observing a minute’s silence and playing the national anthem prior to performances as mark of their respect.

Penkhull Village Hall in Stoke-on-Trent shared a photograph of their Union Flag at half mast this morning

Mulbarton Village Hall in Norwich joined other community groups in sharing its condolences after yesterday’s news 

Station billboards, like this one at London Euston, were also emblazoned with pictures of Queen Elizabeth. Here she is pictured with NetworkRail workers and the tribute reads: ‘Her Majesty, remembered with affection by the railway family’

Tearful mourners returned to Buckingham Palace, Windsor Castle and Balmoral this morning to lay flowers and pay tribute to the Queen.

Mourners, many dressed all in black, congregated beside hundreds of colourful bouquets and messages at the central London palace, which had been left overnight and early in the morning. 

A large Union flag in tones of black and grey has been pinned to the right flank of the gates, while police officers kept a crowd back from the main gates further to the left. 

Thousands of well-wishers flocked to the iconic royal landmarks last night as news broke of the monarch’s passing.

A Union flag atop Buckingham Palace lowered at 6.30pm. It drew gasps from the crowd who knew what the symbolic gesture meant.

The sad news of the Queen’s death was then announced officially. Some people in the crowd wept as others gave an impromptu rendition of God Save The Queen.

As the sun broke through the clouds this morning, many more emotional faces were seen arriving to pay their own personal respects to Her Majesty, as the country is plunged into a period of official mourning.

At midday today, bells are set to toll at St Paul’s and Westminster Abbey and other churches across the country to honour her. 

It comes after senior royals dashed to be at the Queen’s bedside yesterday, but are said to have tragically not reached Balmoral in time before she passed. 

Only her eldest children, Prince Charles and Princess Anne, who were already in Scotland at the time of the Monarch’s sudden turn for the worse, were able to make it to the royal estate before her death, sources said last night.

A woman sheds tears after laying down floral tributes at Buckingham Palace to the Queen, who died yesterday aged 96

A woman appears emotional as members of the public leave flowers and tributes outside Buckingham Palace this morning

Mourners gather at Balmoral Castle this morning where the Queen died yesterday at the age of 96

A police officer places flowers at Buckingham Palace this morning, following the passing of Britain’s Queen Elizabeth

People gather to pay their respects outside Buckingham Palace in London on September 9, 2022, a day after Queen Elizabeth II died at the age of 96

A person carries floral tribute in front of Buckingham Palace this morning, following the passing of Queen Elizabeth yesterday

People hug each other as they gather to pay their respects outside Buckingham Palace in London this morning

People gather outside Buckingham Palace in the early hours of this morning, after the Queen’s death was announced yesterday

A woman appears emotional as members of the public leave flowers and tributes outside Buckingham Palace this morning

 Mourners gather at Buckingham Palace in Central London today to pay respects to Queen Elizabeth II who died yesterday

A person reacts near floral tributes placed at Buckingham Palace, following the passing of Queen Elizabeth yesterday

People leave flowers at Windsor Castle, following the passing of Britain’s Queen Elizabeth yesterday

Mourners, many dressed all in black, congregated beside hundreds of colourful bouquets and messages at the central London palace, which had been left overnight and early in the morning

A police officer reacts as he stands guard in front of Buckingham Palace, following the passing of Britain’s Queen Elizabeth

People leave flowers at Windsor Castle, following the passing of Britain’s Queen Elizabeth yesterday

Police officers rearrange flowers, candles and flags laid outside the gates of Buckingham Palace in London this morning

People look at flowers at the gates of Balmoral in Scotland following the death of Queen Elizabeth II on Thursday

A person holds a floral tribute in front of Buckingham Palace, following the passing of Queen Elizabeth yesterday

Mourners gather at Buckingham Palace in Central London today to pay respects to Queen Elizabeth II who died on Thursday

A Ukrainian flag is placed among other tributes to Queen Elizabeth II outside Buckingham Palace this morning

Mourners gather at Buckingham Palace in Central London today to pay respects to Queen Elizabeth II who died yesterday

A woman lays flowers by the railings at Buckingham Palace, London, following the death of Queen Elizabeth II on Thursday

Raindrops are seen on a photograph left at the gates of Buckingham Palace by a mourner in London this morning

A woman lays flowers by the railings at Buckingham Palace, London, following the death of Queen Elizabeth II on Thursday

A person reacts near Buckingham Palace, following the passing of Queen Elizabeth, in London yesterday

Floral tributes for Queen Elizabeth are left at the gates of Holyroodhouse, Edinburgh this morning following her death yesterday

A woman lays flowers by the railings at Buckingham Palace, London, following the death of Queen Elizabeth II on Thursday

A family arrive to leave flowers at Balmoral in Scotland following the death of Queen Elizabeth II on Thursday

Floral tributes for Queen Elizabeth are left at the gates of Holyroodhouse, Edinburgh this morning after her death yesterday

A family arrive to leave flowers at Balmoral in Scotland following the death of Queen Elizabeth II on Thursday

Security teams arrange floral tributes for Queen Elizabeth are left at the gates of Holyroodhouse, Edinburgh today

A sign outside Buckingham Palace reads: ‘Floral tributes in this area will be removed after 12 hours and placed in the tribute area in Green Park’

A woman lays flowers among tributes to Queen Elizabeth II outside Buckingham Palace this morning

Flowers and tributes outside of Windsor Castle this morning after the death of the Queen was announced yesterday

A man lays flowers outside Holyroodhouse in Edinburgh this morning after the death of the Queen was announced yesterday

Flowers and tributes outside of Windsor Castle this morning after the death of the Queen was announced yesterday

People arrive to place flowers outside of Buckingham Palace in London, a day after Queen Elizabeth II died at the age of 96

People place flowers at Buckingham Palace, following the passing of Britain’s Queen Elizabeth in London yesterday

A person reacts near Buckingham Palace, following the passing of Queen Elizabeth, in London yesterday

Flowers and tributes outside of Windsor Castle this morning after the death of the Queen was announced yesterday

All Her Majesty’s children, as well as grandson Prince William, had rushed to Balmoral on Thursday after doctors became ‘concerned’ for her health. Buckingham Palace released a statement at 12.32pm saying the Queen’s doctors were ‘concerned’ for her health and recommended she remain under medical supervision while family members were informed.

Charles was already at his mother’s side at her beloved Highland home after senior aides, fearing the worst, sent the Queen’s burgundy-liveried helicopter up from Windsor at 6.48am to collect him from Dumfries House in Ayrshire, where he had stayed the night after conducting several official engagements. He made it to Balmoral by 10.27am.

His wife, the Duchess of Cornwall – now Queen Consort, as Elizabeth II requested earlier this year – was already at Birkhall, the couple’s Scottish retreat, and was driven over by car to join him.

It is understood that the Queen’s daughter, Princess Anne, was already with her mother as she had been undertaking engagements in the area.

Staff hurriedly arranged for a jet to collect the Queen’s other children – Prince Edward, the Earl of Wessex, and Prince Andrew, the Duke of York – as well as the Countess of Wessex, whom the Queen adores and treats like a second daughter – and bring them up to Aberdeen.

Her grandson, Prince William joined them. His wife Kate remained with their three children, who have recently started a new school.

The sombre family group arrived in Scotland at 4pm, sweeping through the gates at Balmoral in a Range Rover driven by William at 5.06pm. Although Buckingham Palace has not confirmed the time of death, it is thought that they were unable to see their much-loved matriarch before she died.

By coincidence the Duke and Duchess of Sussex – now sadly estranged from most family members – were in Britain from their home in California and due to undertake a charity engagement in London before flying back home to their children.

There was confusion when their spokesman initially said that both Harry and Meghan would fly up to Balmoral to join the family, which caused surprise as spouses would normally be unlikely to join close relatives at a time of personal grief.

But it was later confirmed that Harry would travel alone and he finally arrived at his grandmother’s home at 7.52pm. He was still in the air when the death was confirmed.

The Queen’s death was finally announced at 6.32pm in a short black-edged statement from Buckingham Palace which read simply: ‘The Queen died peacefully at Balmoral this afternoon. The King and The Queen Consort will remain at Balmoral this evening and will return to London tomorrow.’

Today Operation London Bridge will swing into action, the period of ten days between the Queen’s death and her state funeral, which is expected to take place on Monday September 19, as the country is plunged into a period of official mourning.

The Queen’s coffin is expected to remain at Balmoral for at least the next two days before being flown back down to London next week.

But the pendulum to introduce His Majesty to his people will also begin to swing, with Charles and Camilla returning to London as King and Queen Consort today. He is expected to hold his Accession Council tomorrow.

Last night Miss Truss hosted a meeting of ministers, police and royal officials to discuss arrangements for the period of mourning leading up to the Queen’s funeral.

The Union flag on Buckingham Palace was poignantly lowered to half-mast yesterday, while a framed plaque of the statement announcing the Queen’s death was placed on the front gates by royal household staff.

The Royal Standard is never flown at half-mast, even after the Queen’s death, as there is always a monarch on the throne. Flags will fly at half-mast on UK Government buildings in tribute to the Queen from now until the morning after her funeral.

The Queen’s death will see Britain and her Commonwealth realms enter into a ten-day period of mourning as millions of her subjects in the UK and abroad come to terms with her passing.

A number of big events have already been cancelled, including the BBC’s Proms and its famous crescendo, Last Night of the Proms, which were due to take place on Friday and Saturday.

Source: Read Full Article