BRITS will be pinged on their mobile if they are near a natural disaster or terror attack under a new system going live this summer. 

Minister Penny Mordaunt revealed the network will be online in weeks to "quickly warn people of any danger to life." 

The government has been testing the system over the last few weeks, with phones blaring a siren noise even if turned on silent. 

Details of the disaster, as well as advice on staying safe then appear as a text message. 

Similar systems are used in the US and New Zealand, but this is the first time the system will go live across the UK. 

Ms Mordant said the “new national emergency alerting system” will work to alert people to emergencies like “ fires, flooding and terrorist attacks.”

She said: “The system will send a warning alert directly to personal mobile devices, providing clear guidance about how people can protect themselves. 

“As seen in other countries, such alerting systems have the potential to save many lives and the system should roll out across the UK this summer.”

“The system will send a warning alert directly to personal mobile devices, providing clear guidance about how people can protect themselves."

The USA, Netherlands, Canada, South Korea, Japan and New Zealand all have similar systems in place.

The trials started in May one test run done in East Suffolk.

During the early stages of the pandemic the Government had to rely on mobile operators to send messages to customers.

The new system will be able to contact people with both national and local alerts.

Personal details including phone numbers don't need to be shared, and the tech means there's no extra strain on the phone network.

The phone system will work alongside a new “situation center” which will be an extension of our government’s crisis Cobra meetings. 

It will bring together “data, intelligence, and expertise” during emergencies. 

Ms Mordaunt added: “It will allow for the sharing of a common evidence base upon which timely and informed decisions can be made. 

“We cannot make decisions or build resilience in silos.”

    Source: Read Full Article