Children will need practice using SCISSORS in catch-up lessons to make up for lockdown, teachers are told

  • The DoE has published guidance asking teachers to prioritise ‘key knowledge’
  • Teachers should address shortfalls in learning caused by pandemic lockdowns 
  • Study should be used to ‘maximise the number of words children can read, spell’

Schools may need to ‘substantially’ modify curriculums to help pupils catch up following lockdown learning losses, according to government guidance.

The Department for Education has published non-statutory guidance for teachers of pupils under 14, advising them to prioritise key knowledge and skills within individual subjects, such as practising to use scissors in art. 

It says teachers should provide a ‘broad and balanced’ curriculum in all subjects to aid ‘education recovery’ in primaries and secondaries. 

But staff must focus on ‘teaching missed content that will allow pupils to make sense of later work’.

Schools may need to ‘substantially’ modify curriculums to help pupils catch up following lockdown learning losses, including teaching them how to use scissors, according to government guidance (file photo)

In English at reception and key stage one (under seven), teachers should identify shortfalls in phonic knowledge and ‘revise lessons that address these gaps’. 

Teaching time should be ‘used to maximise the number of words children read and spell’.

At key stage two (ages seven to 11), teachers should implement shorter writing tasks, rather than extended pieces, to allow pupils to focus on sentence structure and spelling.

In science, studying herbivores at key stage one will allow children to learn about food chains later in primary school. In geography, pupils aged five to seven must know basics such as the names and locations of the world’s continents and oceans.

And in history for this age group, teachers may ‘choose to return to previous or missed topics with a clear focus on the knowledge that is most important’. 

Swimming and water safety should be a focus in PE at key stage two, if ‘not secured’ already.

Swimming and water safety should be a focus in PE at key stage two, if ‘not secured’ already, according to new guidance from the Department of Education

Source: Read Full Article