GEORGE Floyd's brother raised his fist outside the White House and demanded Congress passes a police reform bill.

The move comes after the family met with President Joe Bidenon the first anniversary of George Floyd's death.

Read our George Floyd live blog for the latest updates


The family's lawyer Benjamin Crump said in a statement after the meeting: "We have to respect the spilled blood that's on this legislation – it must be meaningful and we can do this together."

Floyd, 46, died last Memorial Day, May 25, after ex-cop Derek Chauvin kneeled on his neck for almost nine and a half minutes.  

Chauvin was convicted of the black father’s murder last month while three other cops also involved in the arrest await trial in August. 

Floyd's brother, Philonise Floyd, told reporters about the President: "He's a genuine guy. They always speak from the heart."

"We're just thankful for what's going on and we just want the George Floyd Policing Act to be passed.

"If you can make federal laws to protect the bird, which is the bald eagle, you can make federal laws to protect people of color."

"The Floyd family meeting went incredibly well. We spent a long time together. I got a chance to spend a lot of time with Gianna and her family," Biden said.

He added that he gave her a hug and snacks, including Cheetos and milk.

"My wife will kill me," he joked.





Floyd's family first met with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Tuesday as they continued to push for the passing of the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act.

The police reform bill is curently stalled in the Senate.

“They’ve been working tremendously to help push the issue of getting this law passed. I thank you all so much," George Floyd’s brother, Philonise Floyd, said.

"Our families thank you that you are all here today."

“Today is the day that he set the world in a rage,” he continued.

“And people realized what's going on in America, and we all said, ‘Enough is enough.’

“We need to be working together to make sure that people do not live in fear in America any more.”

Pelosi said that George Floyd’s daughter was right when she had claimed he changed the world.

“Gianna said, ‘My daddy will change the world.’ Indeed, her prediction is coming true,” she told reporters.






On Tuesday afternoon, Biden welcomed Bridgett Floyd, his daughter Gianna Floyd, and Gianna's mother, Roxie Washington, to the White House.

The meeting was held in private so Biden can have a “real conversation and preserve that with the family,” said White House press secretary Jen Psaki said. 

In a statement issued after the meeting, Biden spoke about the “battle for the soul of America.”

“The Floyd family has shown extraordinary courge , especially his young daughter Gianna who I met again today," Biden said.

“The day before her father’s funeral a year ago, Jill and I met the family and she told me, ‘Daddy changed the world.’

“He has.”

Biden also reinforced his support for police reform.

“To deliver real change, we must have accountability when law enforcement officers violate their oaths, and we need to build lasting trust between the vast majority of the men and women who wear the badge honorably and the communities they are sworn to serve and protect," the statement read.

“We can and must have both accountability and trust in our justice system."



The president had previously set a goal of having it passed by the anniversary of Floyd’s death but Psaki said Friday that Biden now aims to have the bill on his desk “as quickly as possible.”

The bill, if passed, will establish a national registry of police misconduct and a ban on racial and religious profiling by law enforcement. 

It will also call for an overhaul of qualified immunity for police officers. 

On Tuesday, Pelosi issued a letter to her Democratic colleagues urging the Senate to get a version of the bill passed.

"The House passed the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act on June 25, exactly one month after George Floyd's murder," Pelosi wrote.

"In this new Congress once again, we proudly passed this vital legislation.

"As Congresswoman Bass engages in negotiations on next steps, we remain hopeful that we will, in a bipartisan spirit, reach agreement and pass this legislation in its final form," she continued.

Floyd’s memorial ceremonies began over the weekend with activists and family members taking to the streets in Minneapolis and New York to honor his memory.

On Tuesday, the main memorials will take place in the Twin Cities with other events planned from DC to Dallas. 



Minnesota Gov Tim Walz has called for a moment of silence at 1pm for nine minutes and 29 seconds – the amount of time Floyd was seen pinned to the ground by cops as he told them he couldn’t breathe in now-infamous bystander footage. 

Members of Floyd’s family will also attend the memorial events in Minneapolis where several demonstrations are planned. 

The George Floyd Memorial Foundation, founded by his sister Bridgett, will hold its third day of rallies outside the Hennepin County Government Center. 

Protesters fled from the area on Tuesday morning as alleged shots were fired and one person was reportedly injured.

Minneapolis Police confirmed they responded to a report of a shooting just after 10am CT.

Police said one person later arrived at hospital with a gunshot wound.

The alleged victim has been described as in a “critical but non-life-threatening” condition.

Photos from the area showed a storefront had broken windows after the shooting.



A George Floyd remembrance memorial will begin outside Brooklyn Museum from 8pm and a March to Defund the NYPD outside of the Barclay’s Center at 5pm. 

Mayor Bill de Blasio took a knee alongside other New York City lawmakers and Rev Al Sharpton on Tuesday afternoon to mark George Floyd’s death.

De Blasio said in a press conference on Tuesday morning that Floyd “should be alive right now.”

“It was unacceptable and beyond,” he added.


“But what we saw after this murder was something better — people speaking out, people coming together, people fighting for change.”

Rev Al Sharpton told the crowd that it is time to "fix policing."

Floyd’s family has urged supporters to use Tuesday to call their elected officials – especially Senators – in an effort to get the bill passed. 

    Source: Read Full Article