Girl, 13, sets herself on fire while trying to copy a TikTok stunt leaving her in intensive care for two weeks with third-degree burns

  • Destini Crane, from Portland, Oregon, seriously burned her neck and right arm
  • Trying to copy trick where someone draws shape with alcohol then sets it on fire
  • Destini, who Kimberly said ‘lived for TikToks’, in hospital since stunt on May 13  

A 13-year-old girl has been in intensive care for two weeks with third-degree burns after setting herself on fire while trying to copy a TikTok stunt.

Destini Crane, from Portland, Oregon, seriously burned her neck and right arm while apparently trying to copy a trick where someone draws a shape with flammable liquid on a mirror before setting it on fire.

In the home bathroom where the seventh grader attempted the risky stunt on May 13, her mother found a candle, a lighter and a bottle of rubbing alcohol, which is believed to have exploded in the poorly-ventilated space.

Destini Crane, from Portland, Oregon, seriously burned her neck and right arm while apparently trying to copy a trick where someone draws a shape with flammable liquid on a mirror before setting it on fire. She is pictured in intensive care 

‘I was in the living room talking with my mom, and I heard her scream my name,’ Kimberly Crane told ABC News.

‘So I went and opened the bathroom door and everything was on fire. Destini was on fire. Things in the bathroom were on fire.’

Kimberly took her daughter outside and managed to remove her burning shirt while a neighbor called 911.

Destini, who Kimberly said ‘lived for TikToks’, was taken to intensive care where she has been ever since.

She has not been able to speak since the incident but her family pieced together what had happened by what they found and speaking to friends.

Her phone was still recording footage after the explosion.

Kimberly said she hopes Destini will be able to move into a burn unit soon, but she is expected to need several months to recover and regain mobility in her neck, shoulders and fingers, as well as the use of her arm.

‘That is just going to be a lifelong thing, of her doing physical therapy to keep her mobility,’ Kimberly said.

She added that she wanted to share what had happened to raise awareness of the danger of similar stunts.

In the home bathroom where Destini (pictured) attempted the risky stunt on May 13, her mother found a candle, a lighter and a bottle of rubbing alcohol, which is believed to have exploded in the poorly-ventilated space

Destini’s mother, Kimberly, (who she is pictured with in an undated photo) took her daughter outside and managed to remove her burning shirt while a neighbor called 911

The minimum age for TikTok is just 13, and the app has been linked to a series of injuries among child users.

Last March, a 13-year-old Jersey boy was left badly hurt in hospital after a ‘skull-breaker challenge’, a dangerous game that involves someone before tricked into jumping in the air as someone else kicks their feet from under them.

Two teenage boys were charged with third-degree aggravated assault and third-degree endangering an injured victim for their part in the challenge.

Stacy and Mark Shenker’s 13-year-old son, a Cherry Hill middle school student, was rushed to the hospital after he fell victim to the challenge.

Mark said: ‘Just because you see that something looks funny doesn’t mean when you try to do it, that it’s going to be.’

Also last year 15-year-old Oklahoma girl who died after overdosing on Benadryl as part of another ‘challenge’ in which teens took large doses of the anti-allergy drug to hallucinate.

Chloe Marie Phillips of Blanchard died in the early morning hours of August 21.

Chloe Marie Phillips, 15, of Blanchard, Oklahoma, died in the early morning hours of August 21, 2020 after she overdosed on Benadryl following a TikTok challenge 

Janette Sissy Leasure, Chloe’s great aunt, posted a now-deleted message on Facebook urging families to be on alert for kids taking part in the ‘Benadryl challenge.’

‘This needs to stop taking our kids or putting them in the hospital,’ she wrote on Facebook.

‘Don’t let it take any more kids…I don’t want to see any families go through what we are going through right now,’ she wrote.

Parents are able to restrict what content their children can see by enabling the platform’s ‘restricted mode’.

Dailymail.com has contacted TikTok for comment. 

Source: Read Full Article