Health workers threaten MORE strikes with a further SIX walkouts planned in bid to force Government to back down over pay

  • Union sources said the GMB could announce a further six strikes on Monday
  • The British Medical Associations is also recommending action by junior doctors
  • Talks about a one-off payment and funding for it remain at an early stage 

Ambulance workers and hospital doctors were last night threatening more strikes, despite fresh talks between unions and ministers on pay.

Union sources said the GMB could, on Monday, announce a further six strikes by ambulance workers in a bid to ramp up pressure on ministers to give ground.

And the British Medical Association said it would be recommending strike action by junior doctors.

Professor Phil Banfield, chairman of the BMA council, said junior doctors needed to act to reverse a 25 per cent fall in real- terms pay over the past 15 years.

Ambulance workers and hospital doctors were last night threatening more strikes, despite fresh talks between unions and ministers on pay. Pictured: An ambulance worker takes part in a strike in London on January 11

Health Secretary Steve Barclay is hoping to hold fresh talks with the Royal College of Nursing ahead of two planned strikes next week (pictured on January 10)

Speaking after talks with Health Secretary Steve Barclay, he said: ‘If opening the junior doctors’ ballot opened the door to the long-awaited meeting with Government, then we can only imagine what a “yes” vote in that ballot will do.’

But Mr Barclay is hoping to hold fresh talks with the Royal College of Nursing ahead of two planned strikes next week.

Whitehall sources said ministers were working on options for resolving strikes, which could include a one-off payment to reflect cost of living pressures.

However, talks about what level of payment might be offered, and how it would be funded, remain at an early stage.

No formal proposal has been put to the Treasury and a Government source said there were no plans ‘at this time’ to provide extra cash, meaning ministers would have to secure efficiencies to pay for it.

Source: Read Full Article