Rare one-horned rhino calf is born at an Australian zoo – as keepers reveal his adorable name

  • Birth of greater one-horned rhino calf celebrated at Taronga Western Plains Zoo
  • Greater one-horned rhinos are classified as vulnerable in the wild 
  • Just 3700 of the animals remain in north eastern India and Nepal 

The birth of a greater one-horned rhino calf is being celebrated at Taronga Western Plains Zoo at Dubbo in NSW.

Greater one-horned rhinos are classified as vulnerable in the wild, with just 3700 of the animals remaining in north eastern India and Nepal.

Keepers discovered the newborn alongside his mum Amala in the early hours of October 17 and named him Hari, which means sun in Nepalese.

The birth of a greater one-horned rhino calf is being celebrated at Taronga Western Plains Zoo at Dubbo in NSW

Keepers discovered the newborn alongside his mum Amala in the early hours of October 17 and named him Hari, which means sun in Nepalese

‘This is Amala’s second calf and she slowly bonded with him over the course of the first day,’ keeper Katharina Pollock said in a statement on Tuesday.

‘She is now very protective of him and doesn’t like him being too far from her side.’

Zoo director Steve Hinks said the birth was a testament to the dedicated team of keepers and veterinary staff who guided the introduction process between Amala and the calf’s sire, Dora.

‘We have an experienced team who work in rhino conservation and this birth is another achievement for a species under threat,’ he said.

‘This is Amala’s second calf and she slowly bonded with him over the course of the first day,’ keeper Katharina Pollock said in a statement on Tuesday

Taronga Western Plains Zoo is the only Zoo in Australia to hold and breed three species of rhino – black rhino, white rhino and greater one-horned rhino.

This birth follows the arrival of female black rhino calf Sabi Star earlier this year.

Amala and her calf are bonding out of public view and will make their public debut within weeks.

Greater one-horned rhinos are classified as vulnerable in the wild, with just 3700 of the animals remaining in north eastern India and Nepal

Source: Read Full Article