Ukraine: Russia allegedly using Zaporizhzhia plant for supplies

We use your sign-up to provide content in ways you’ve consented to and to improve our understanding of you. This may include adverts from us and 3rd parties based on our understanding. You can unsubscribe at any time. More info

Over the past weekend Ukraine accused Russia of causing “nuclear terror” following its continued attack on the site which damaged various areas of the plant. Ukraine also demanded from the West that further sanctions are put in place on Russia due to its dangerous actions which could have catastrophic consequences.

On the weekend, Enerhoatom, the Ukrainian nuclear energy company responsible for the plant, said: “The Russian occupiers once again fired rockets at the site of Zaporizhzhia nuclear plant and the town of Enerhodar.

“One…employee was hospitalised with shrapnel wounds caused by the explosion.”

The company confirmed that the plant was hit five times on Thursday whereas Russia’s TASS news agency reported that Russian-appointed officials said Ukraine shelled the plant twice.

The strikes on the weekend damaged some administration buildings at the nuclear plant while other rockets also fell into a “zone storing used nuclear fuel”.

The company added that a separate attack last Friday damaged three radiation sensors at the site along with 174 containers which hold spent nuclear fuel were stored in the open at the dry storage area which was hit.

Following the events of the weekend, the nuclear watchdog for the United Nations called the International Atomic Energy Agency warned of “the very real risk of a nuclear disaster”.

A spokesperson from the Agency added: “Any military firepower directed at or from the facility would amount to playing with fire, with potentially catastrophic consequences.”

Now the UN chief has encouraged the implementation of a demilitarised zone at the nuclear plant following the fears of “catastrophic consequences”.

At the UN Security Council meeting on Thursday, Secretary-General Antonio Guterres told both Ukraine and Russia to cease fighting at or around the nuclear site.

The Secretary-General said: “The facility must not be used as part of any military operation.

“Instead, urgent agreement is needed at a technical level on a safe perimeter of demilitarisation to ensure the safety of the area.”

At the meeting, the United States supported the implementation of the demilitarised area and encouraged the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to go and assess the site which is currently being run by Ukrainian workers.

DON’T MISS:
Bus that crashed injuring 37 driven by man ‘without correct training’ (REVEAL)
Mum-of-eight dies at 47 after spending years indoors (INSIGHT)
M5 traffic latest: British Airways Boeing 747 plane driven up motorway (REVEAL)

The company added that a separate attack last Friday damaged three radiation sensors at the site along with 174 containers which hold spent nuclear fuel were stored in the open at the dry storage area which was hit.

Following the events of the weekend, the nuclear watchdog for the United Nations called the International Atomic Energy Agency warned of “the very real risk of a nuclear disaster”.

A spokesperson from the Agency added: “Any military firepower directed at or from the facility would amount to playing with fire, with potentially catastrophic consequences.”

Now the UN chief has encouraged the implementation of a demilitarised zone at the nuclear plant following the fears of “catastrophic consequences”.

Source: Read Full Article