STORM Evert has OBLITERATED campsites across the country – with owners now telling holidaymakers to “pack up and go home”.

It comes as three weeks of rain is set to batter Britain today while wind and thunder warnings remain in place.



As newly named Storm Evert gathers pace, winds of up to 75mph are expected to lash the South West, with coastal gales and rain set to affect parts of the country.

The storm will move across parts of the UK, giving a "wet and windy start" to Friday for the southern and central regions, the Met Office said.

Steven Keates, a meteorologist from the Met Office, said: "The wind will get worse before it gets better.

"The highest gust of wind is on the Isles of Scilly, which is 45 knots or 52mph.

"There is the potential for 60mph in coastal areas of west Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly.

"There is the chance of seeing something a little stronger than that from midnight to 3am, where as per the amber warning, there is the chance of seeing gusts of up to 75mph in one or two very exposed coastal spots, mainly in Cornwall."

Many Brits who had escaped to the country for a break had their tents battered and torn last night by heavy rain and wind.

One owner, Sarah Weeks from clifftop glamping site Seaview Tipis, even told guests to “pack up and go, for their safety.”


Meanwhile RAC Breakdown spokesman Rod Dennis said: “The arrival of a summer storm to the South West could take drivers – and indeed all holidaymakers in the region – by surprise. 

“The sheer strength of the wind coupled with huge volumes of traffic will make driving conditions hazardous, particularly for those towing caravans and trailers.

“We strongly recommend drivers check over their vehicles before setting out – ensuring roofboxes are firmly secured – and try to avoid exposed coastal and moorland routes where the impacts of the wind on driving will be the greatest. 

“Drivers should reduce their speeds accordingly to help ensure they complete their journeys safely.”

Yellow weather warnings are in place from 8pm tonight until midday tomorrow for the southwest, southern Wales and along the southern coast of England.  

Met Office Principal Operational Meteorologist Dan Suri said, “Storm Evert will bring some high winds, particularly along the northern coast of the southwest, but there will be gusty winds more widely in southern areas, which brings the potential for some impacts, especially for those that might be travelling or camping in the weather.  

“Storm Evert will move eastwards across southern UK during Friday daytime, clearing into the North Sea during Friday evening. 


“As well as the high winds, there will also be some heavy rain before it leaves our shores, with up to 40 mm possible over parts of Wales and the southwest and the potential for 40 or 50 mm rain in a short period of time from heavy, possibly thundery, showers over parts of eastern and central England on Friday afternoon.” 

On social media on Thursday night, people were sharing videos of heavy rain and large waves as the storm began.

Flooding and stormy weather has led to disruption in some parts of the country.

Cumbria County Council said 14 properties have been evacuated and some roads and footpaths have been closed due to a landslip in Parton, west Cumbria.

The Environment Agency has six flood alerts for areas including parts of south London and an area on the Isle of Wight.

The naming of Storm Evert comes on the day the Government announced that more than £860 million is to be invested in flood prevention schemes across the UK over the next year.

Evert is the first storm to be named in the month of July by the Met Office's storm naming group, although named summer storms are not unprecedented.

In 2020, Storm Ellen hit from August 19 to 20, before Storm Francis moved over the UK on August 25.

    Source: Read Full Article