THE Queen has marked what would have been the Duke of Edinburgh’s 100th birthday with a special commemorative rose.

The specially bred rose was planted in the grounds of Windsor Castle.

🔵 Read our Royal Family live blog for the latest updates

What is the Duke of Edinburgh rose?

The Royal Horticultural Society (RHS) presented the Queen with the touching gift to mark what would have been Prince Philip’s centenary.

Harkness Roses, which has been breeding and growing British roses since 1879, bred the bloom.

The rose is a deep pink colour with white lines and double-flowered and specially bred for the occasion.

The rose was presented to her by RHS president Keith Weed.

Queen Elizabeth described the gift as "lovely" and the tribute as "very kind".

At the presentation, held at Windsor Castle, Mr Weed said: "It's a rose named the Duke of Edinburgh Rose to mark his centenary and it's a commemorative rose for all the marvellous things that he did over his lifetime and for everyone to remember so much that he did.

"Each rose, there's a donation that goes to the Living Legacy Fund which will help more children. It's a beautiful flower in itself, a double flower."

Following the presentation the Queen watched as the shrub bush was planted by Windsor's head gardener Philip Carter in the front of the castle's mixed rose border in the East Terrace Garden.

Why is the Queen marking Prince Philip's birthday with a rose?

As well as marking the Duke’s birthday the rose is a way for people to remember his achievements during his life time.

Harkness Roses will donate £2.50 from each rose sold to The Duke of Edinburgh's Award Living Legacy Fund.

The scheme, set up by the Duke, helps fund young people to get involved with the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award Scheme which was set up by Philip in 1956.

The fund has already raised £500,000 since the Duke’s death at Windsor Castle on April 9, 2021.

Prince Philip played a key role in redesigning the layout of the East Terrace Garden and also commissioned the bronze lotus fountain at the centre.

    Source: Read Full Article