Elvis Presley 'would have loved' new biopic film says Tom Jones

We use your sign-up to provide content in ways you’ve consented to and to improve our understanding of you. This may include adverts from us and 3rd parties based on our understanding. You can unsubscribe at any time. More info

Growing up in 1950s Liverpool, John Lennon – who would have been 82 this month – and Paul McCartney fell in love with rising star Elvis Presley’s rock and roll music. When The Beatles reached the heights of his fame for themselves, the Fab Four famously met The King at his LA home in 1965. However, as time went by, their assessment of the singer – who told President Nixon in 1970 that they were anti-American – changed.

Just two days before his murder on December 8, 1980, Lennon told BBC Radio 1 that Elvis was never the same again after he joined the army in 1958. The King went to West Germany for his two years of military service and returned to star in a string of movies, many of which were of poor quality.

The 40-year-old said: “When Elvis died, people were harassing me in Tokyo for a comment. Well I’ll give it yer now, he died when he went in the army. That’s when they killed him. The rest of it was just a living death.”

Amazon Music 30-day FREE Trial

£FREE View Deal

Want to listen to your favourite artists and the latest songs? Sign up for a free 30 day trial at the link to listen to unlimited music on Amazon Music!

Lennon said of Elvis’ military service: “But [it wasn’t like] going to a Zen monastery and going to India to meditate. Or going to Scotland and growing melons or something, whatever they’re doing up there in that place.”

In 1994, McCartney shared a similar view of The King during an interview with guitar writer Tony Bacon.

The Beatles legend said: “Elvis was the guy. He ended up a complete plonker, unfortunately—he turned in the end, wanted to become a Federal drug marshal.”

Nevertheless, McCartney added: “But I did love him in the early days, and yes, when we met him, that’s the period I remember. I don’t bother when you go into Vegas and the rhinestones and all that—it’s like he didn’t exist from then on for me.”

Queen drummer Roger Taylor previously shared with Express.co.uk a similar view of how Elvis changed. The 73-year-old told us: “I think Elvis influenced everybody. I was very young then, only in the beginning. He was so fantastic in the very early day and so mesmeric if you watch the early footage of him performing. He was just fabulous.”

DON’T MISS
Elvis: Graceland upstairs photo and recording shared by Linda Thompson [GRACELAND UPSTAIRS]

Elvis Presley’s family on his facelifts, webbed toes and dyed hair [ELVIS]
Elvis ‘other children’ – King’s family on claims star had more kids [ELVIS KIDS]

Like Lennon especially, Taylor believes it was all downhill for The King after his army service. The drummer said: “I think after Elvis went in the army, he didn’t influence [Queen] at all. In fact, he became a sort of side paragraph. He didn’t really have a lot of relevance, I thought. He was a rebel, but when he joined the army it all sort of disappeared into sh***y films and paying off his manager’s debts in Las Vegas.”

Upon hearing The Beatle’ view of the singer, he replied: “I couldn’t agree more. John Lennon also said Little Richard’s better than Elvis and I’d have to agree with him there!”

Source: Read Full Article