SENIOR Tory figures have warned that Boris Johnson's survival as PM depends on addressing the garden party allegations and issuing a 'heart felt apology'.

Many have warned that he would have to resign if wrongdoing was proved, while others suggested he could soon face a confidence vote.

One Cabinet member told The Times: "It's not terminal yet — there's still room for humility and a heartfelt apology. We're f***ed unless we resolve it. Everyone knows this thing happened; nobody is disputing that.

"The row has moved on from whether the party took place to questions around denial and prevarication. PMQs will be agonising. We f***ed up. It doesn't have to be terminal if he's prepared to take his medicine. But it's unquestionably done harm."

Many close to Dominic Cummings are said to be claiming Mr Johnson had only a 20 per cent chance of political survival.

Read our covid live blog below for the latest news and updates…

  • Louis Allwood

    What could the results be of 5 day isolation?

    Only two per cent more people would be infectious if Covid isolation ended on day five, analysis shows.

    Eight per cent of infected people would be able to spread the disease on the fifth day after two negative lateral flow tests.

    It compares with 6.2 per cent on the seventh, the UK Health Security Agency found.

    Separate data showed 31.4 per cent of people were still infectious after five days.

    But two negative tests more than halved the risk of being released while infectious.

    Ministers are under pressure to reduce the self-isolation period.

    Boris Johnson’s spokesman said: “If it is possible to go further then we will do so.”

  • Louis Allwood

    Spain suggest DOWNGRADING Covid to ‘like the flu’

    Spanish PM Pedro Sánchez pushed his EU counterparts to debate the possibility of treating Covid like the flu.

    The European leader told a local radio channel the situation in Spain "is not what we faced a year ago" and that it was time "to evaluate the evolution of COVID to an endemic illness".

    The move would see lockdowns and daily infection counts scrapped in favour of a system that would track Covid cases like the regular flu.

    The measure is set to meet stiff resistance from Germany and France where vaccinations rates remain low and where French President Emmanuel Macron has promised to make engaging in public life as tough as possible for the unvaccinated.

    Sánchez cited Spain's "exemplary" vaccine uptake which has seen more than 90 per cent of the population over 11 years old become fully vaccinated and 85 per cent of over 60s get a booster as a case for the radical change.

  • Louis Allwood

    Brits could be the first out of the pandemic, says professor

    Britain may be the first country “out of the pandemic”, a public health expert has said.

    Four in five adults in England have had a booster.

    Public health expert Prof David Heymann said that antibodies from the vaccines, and in those previously infected, means 95 per cent of Brits now having some Covid immunity.

    He said the high levels of protection mean it is increasingly becoming a disease Brits can live with.

    The ex-World Health Organisation boss said: “The UK is the closest to any country of being out of the pandemic — if it isn’t already — and having the disease as endemic as the other four coronaviruses (which cause common colds).”

  • Louis Allwood

    Djokovic’s dad calls on the QUEEN to intervene

    The World Number One's father, Srdjan Djokovic, slammed Australia as a "fake democracy" and claimed his son was being treated as a "political prisoner".

    Officials told him his exemption from strict Covid clamps Down Under was flawed.

    But a judge overturned the decision on Monday, ordering the player’s immediate release from the quarantine hotel and telling the government to pay his legal costs.

    Djokovic’s father Srdjan then sparked hysteria by claiming his son had been arrested and taken back into custody.

    Government officials have insisted Djokovic was never arrested and said he was free to move into his rented accommodation.

    During a press conference in Belgrade, Serbia, Srdjan urged the Queen to get involved in the fiasco and "protect the human rights" of his son, the New Zealand Herald reports.

    According to a translation, he said: "I call on Queen Elizabeth, the leader of the Commonwealth, to intervene and protect the human rights of my son and to stop the political prosecution carried out against him since he came to Australia."

  • Louis Allwood

    Boris Johnson can’t wriggle out of garden party scandal by sacking officials

    This is a comment piece by Trevor Kavanagh, Associate Editor

    “THE Slippery Pig” is in trouble this time.

    There seems no way out of the trap Boris Johnson set for everyone in Britain except, it turns out, himself.

    Lockdown was arguably an abuse of power the moment this novel form of house arrest began.

    It was justified by the threat to the NHS from a lethal pandemic unleashed, probably, from a laboratory in Communist China.

    Indeed — before nearly dying of Covid — Boris planned to reject Sage advice and follow Sweden, trusting people to follow advice without penal sanctions.

    Instead, he created emergency powers to shut Britain down and punish anyone who defied them.

    Ministers and MPs, some in tears, warned he was shredding the hard-won liberties he had spent his life supporting so eloquently in print.

    Who can forget the funeral parlour jobsworth separating a grieving widow from her sons?

    Yet at the very moment Downing Street was issuing these commands, Boris was in the garden with Carrie and 30 staffers quaffing wine and sausage rolls in the sunshine.

    Such contempt for ordinary people, once looked down on as The Great Unwashed, has brought down bigger historic figures than Alex­ander de Pfeffel Boris Johnson.

  • Louis Allwood

    Garden party email leak

    A bombshell leaked email from his top official confirmed the May 20, 2020 “bring your own booze” garden bash.

    Downing Street did not deny the PM and wife Carrie attended the party, that eyewitnesses claim saw 40 civil servants and aides “enjoy the sunshine” while mixing was banned for the rest of the country.

    But the PM stood by embattled mandarin Martin Reynolds, who defied warnings to invite more than 100 staff to the booze-up, insisting he “remained in post” last night.

  • Louis Allwood

    ‘Sort it out or step aside’

    The Prime Minister went into hiding yesterday amid the worst crisis of his premiership over No10’s lockdown garden party.

    Senior Tories and donors questioned BoJo’s future after he did not deny attending the rule-breaking “bring your own booze” bash in May 2020.

    Mobile phone tycoon John Caudwell, a leading Tory donor, branded the scandal “disastrous”.

    He warned the PM: “Sort it out, Boris, or step aside and let someone else sort it out so that the Tories aren’t wiped out at the next election.”

    The Phones4U founder added: "While the rest of us were striving to follow the ever-changing rules — including myself, even when I deemed them to be excessive at best, nonsensical at worst — those who were setting those rules were, apparently freely and frequently, disregarding them.”

  • Louis Allwood

    PCR rule change

    In the UK, a PCR test is no longer needed to confirm a positive lateral flow test if the person has no symptoms of the virus.

    The rule change came into effect in England as of today (January 11), after a similar system was implemented in Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales last week.

    Health chiefs say it is only a temporary measure while Covid rates remain high across the UK.about:blankabout:blank

    Given that lateral flow test results are almost always correct for a positive result, it is not deemed necessary to double check with an NHS PCR test.

    If you have a positive lateral flow result, you need to self-isolate immediately.

  • Louis Allwood

    Boosters provide the most protection

    It comes as a string of hugely positive studies show Omicron IS milder than other strains, with the first official UK report revealing the risk of hospitalisation is 50 to 70 per cent lower than with Delta.

    Covid booster jabs protect against Omicron and offer the best chance to get through the pandemic, health officials have repeatedly said.

    The Sun’s Jabs Army campaign is helping get the vital extra vaccines in Brits’ arms to ward off the need for any new restrictions.

  • Louis Allwood

    Jabs for kids

    Experts believe that the roll out of jabs for kids aged five to 11 may be key to stop disrupting education because of staff shortages.

    Professor Russell Viner believes that the “balance of risks” indicates that schoolchildren should be vaccinated.

    Prof Viner, from University College London, is an expert in child and adolescent health and is a member of SAGE.

    He believes that while the age group are the least affected by covid sickness, if they were jabbed then it could stop the spread of the virus to staff.

    Speaking to the i he said: “Five to 11s are probably the group least affected by Covid disease.

    “The thing about Covid is it’s got the most extraordinary age risk profile… to be honest, five to 11 is the healthiest time of our life.

    “It’s the time when we’re least likely to die or get sick from almost anything, and that is true of Covid.

    “However, I expect and I would like the Government to include educational disruption and mental health issues in the decision, which is what happened with teenagers.

    “I think it’s a very marginal medical decision, but if you include those broader issues.

    “I think given the extremely promising safety profile in children– but I think the balance of risks is towards vaccination.

    “We can be fairly sure that this is really a very safe vaccination for the five to 11-year-olds.”

  • Louis Allwood

    The Sun’s Jab Army needs YOU

    Although Omicron is markedly milder than previous variants, the sheer number of cases have left up to a million people self-isolating and threatening widespread disruption to schools and the economy.

    Ministers also say the combination of boosters and Plan B measures are “working” and are not expected to announce fresh measures.

    A third jab also significantly slashes the risk of falling seriously ill – and The Sun’s Jab’s Army campaign is helping get vital boosters in people’s arms.

  • Louis Allwood

    Omicron wave in London

    Asked whether the Omicron wave is over in London but not elsewhere in the country, Graham Medley, professor of infectious disease modelling at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme: “I think that at the moment the testing capacity issues, and the Christmas and the new year, mean that we can’t really rely on cases to tell us what’s going to happen exactly.

    “At the moment we are seeing a relatively high number of admissions, how long that continues, whether that goes up or goes down, I think is unknown at the moment.”

    He said the Omicron virus itself is “less severe” than Delta but it is “just as threatening” due to its transmissibility.

    Pressed on whether the nation was moving away from a situation where Covid-19 was an “emergency”, Prof Medley said: “I think that that transition is absolutely true. It can’t be an emergency forever.

    “So at some point it will have to stop being an emergency but that is likely to be a phase out rather than an active point in time where somebody can declare the epidemic over.

    “It’s going to fade out and disappear much more slowly than that I think.”

  • Louis Allwood

    PM wants to slash Covid isolation to 5 days

    Boris Johnson yesterday added to calls for the UK Health and Security Agency to revisit guidance that says Brits should quarantine for at least a week.

    His remarks came as boffins were forced to admit they were wrong to slap down calls to slash isolation with untrue claims the US rules are different.

    The UKHSA has already recommended moving from ten to seven days last month as long as people test negative on days six and seven.

    But in a blog last week the agency said our rules couldn't be compared "like with like” with America's, where people can quit quarantine on day 5.

    It claimed isolation in Britain was counted from the day someone experienced symptoms, whereas in the US people had to wait for a positive test.

    However, the agency has now admitted the UK and USA measure the start of Covid isolation from the same point.

    It was forced to correct its advice to MPs, NHS leaders and business chiefs.

  • Louis Allwood

    The 242 locations where cases are still rising

    Cases per 100,000 in the seven days up to January 6. The figure on the RIGHT shows infections, also per 100,000, in the seven days up to December 31.

    1. Derry City and Strabane, Northern Ireland, 4013.7, (6065), 3777.4, (5708)
    2. Fermanagh and Omagh, Northern Ireland, 3309.3, (3883), 2922.4, (3429)
    3. Middlesbrough, North-east England, 3144.0, (4442), 1648.4, (2329)
    4. Barrow-in-Furness, North-west England, 3039.3, (2028), 2786.0, (1859)
    5. Stockton-on-Tees, North-east England, 3015.4, (5953), 1976.5, (3902)
    6. Mid Ulster, Northern Ireland, 2993.6, (4459), 2201.4, (3279)
    7. Copeland, North-west England, 2958.5, (2013), 2718.9, (1850)
    8. Redcar and Cleveland, North-east England, 2879.9, (3952), 1681.1, (2307)
    9. Newry Mourne and Down, Northern Ireland, 2848.0, (5174), 2408.2, (4375)
    10. Hartlepool, North-east England, 2816.6, (2643), 1548.4, (1453)
    11. Allerdale, North-west England, 2766.0, (2706), 1974.8, (1932)
    12. North Tyneside, North-east England, 2722.3, (5686), 1746.5, (3648)
    13. Knowsley, North-west England, 2678.9, (4084), 2385.7, (3637)
    14. Barnsley, Yorkshire & the Humber, 2669.8, (6623), 1832.9, (4547)
    15. Hyndburn, North-west England, 2659.8, (2158), 1818.0, (1475)
    16. South Tyneside, North-east England, 2634.8, (3982), 1500.0, (2267)
    17. Sunderland, North-east England, 2619.8, (7279), 1404.4, (3902)
    18. St Helens, North-west England, 2533.5, (4588), 2450.6, (4438)
    19. Nuneaton and Bedworth, West Midlands, 2522.8, (3289), 1910.7, (2491)
    20. Wirral, North-west England, 2521.8, (8179), 2373.5, (7698)
    21. Burnley, North-west England, 2511.6, (2244), 1986.7, (1775)
    22. Halton, North-west England, 2505.4, (3251), 2378.3, (3086)
    23. Belfast, Northern Ireland, 2480.1, (8496), 2216.8, (7594)
    24. Armagh City Banbridge and Craigavon, Northern Ireland, 2474.8, (5376), 1851.5, (4022)
    25. Northumberland, North-east England, 2455.1, (7950), 1531.4, (4959)
    26. Wakefield, Yorkshire & the Humber, 2449.1, (8611), 1753.7, (6166)
    27. Salford, North-west England, 2431.3, (6387), 2311.8, (6073)
    28. Rotherham, Yorkshire & the Humber, 2428.4, (6435), 1977.1, (5239)
    29. Wigan, North-west England, 2422.7, (8012), 2364.0, (7818)
    30. Gateshead, North-east England, 2421.9, (4891), 1570.7, (3172)
    31. Blackburn with Darwen, North-west England, 2414.9, (3623), 1662.3, (2494)
    32. South Ribble, North-west England, 2414.3, (2682), 2227.1, (2474)
    33. Blackpool, North-west England, 2412.2, (3338), 1918.6, (2655)
    34. Cannock Chase, West Midlands, 2367.9, (2403), 1991.4, (2021)
    35. Blaby, East Midlands, 2349.2, (2395), 1957.8, (1996)
    36. Doncaster, Yorkshire & the Humber, 2336.1, (7307), 1729.3, (5409)
    37. Tameside, North-west England, 2331.0, (5294), 2214.3, (5029)
    38. Chorley, North-west England, 2325.2, (2764), 2169.6, (2579)
    39. Ribble Valley, North-west England, 2308.7, (1432), 1905.7, (1182)
    40. Rochdale, North-west England, 2304.4, (5154), 1968.6, (4403)
    41. Carlisle, North-west England, 2276.9, (2471), 1518.6, (1648)
    42. West Lancashire, North-west England, 2273.4, (2603), 2176.5, (2492)
    43. Warrington, North-west England, 2262.7, (4738), 2161.0, (4525)
    44. West Dunbartonshire, Scotland, 2260.6, (1997), 2053.4, (1814)
    45. County Durham, North-east England, 2246.7, (11978), 1304.1, (6953)
    46. Darlington, North-east England, 2243.0, (2409), 1262.5, (1356)
    47. Antrim and Newtownabbey, Northern Ireland, 2230.2, (3206), 2058.3, (2959)
    48. Neath Port Talbot, Wales, 2229.4, (3219), 2119.3, (3060)
    49. Liverpool, North-west England, 2215.9, (11090), 2127.4, (10647)
    50. Oldham, North-west England, 2201.3, (5231), 1940.0, (4610)
    51. Wolverhampton, West Midlands, 2184.1, (5775), 1776.0, (4696)
    52. Causeway Coast and Glens, Northern Ireland, 2169.1, (3144), 1993.9, (2890)
    53. Dudley, West Midlands, 2168.4, (6990), 1758.3, (5668)
    54. Wyre, North-west England, 2142.1, (2422), 1678.7, (1898)
    55. Newcastle upon Tyne, North-east England, 2140.0, (6566), 1402.1, (4302)
    56. Cheshire West and Chester, North-west England, 2130.7, (7326), 1995.8, (6862)
    57. Fylde, North-west England, 2130.3, (1730), 1800.2, (1462)
    58. Preston, North-west England, 2120.8, (3057), 1662.9, (2397)
    59. Hull, Yorkshire & the Humber, 2109.8, (5467), 1532.5, (3971)
    60. Bolton, North-west England, 2104.1, (6065), 1849.8, (5332)
    61. North Warwickshire, West Midlands, 2100.8, (1375), 1627.1, (1065)
    62. Walsall, West Midlands, 2090.9, (5995), 1627.4, (4666)
    63. South Staffordshire, West Midlands, 2088.7, (2347), 1881.3, (2114)
    64. Pendle, North-west England, 2085.8, (1922), 1472.7, (1357)
    65. Bury, North-west England, 2081.2, (3969), 1967.9, (3753)
    66. Rugby, West Midlands, 2064.2, (2284), 1754.2, (1941)
    67. Kirklees, Yorkshire & the Humber, 2061.5, (9097), 1480.7, (6534)
    68. North East Lincolnshire, Yorkshire & the Humber, 2053.8, (3273), 1735.0, (2765)
    69. Oadby and Wigston, East Midlands, 2043.2, (1171), 1612.2, (924)
    70. North East Derbyshire, East Midlands, 2042.7, (2088), 1970.3, (2014)
    71. Calderdale, Yorkshire & the Humber, 2036.0, (4305), 1614.7, (3414)
    72. Hinckley and Bosworth, East Midlands, 2034.9, (2313), 1712.0, (1946)
    73. Rossendale, North-west England, 2017.3, (1441), 1685.5, (1204)
    74. Moray, Scotland, 2004.0, (1918), 1868.1, (1788)
    75. Corby, East Midlands, 1993.1, (1456), 1592.0, (1163)
    76. Selby, Yorkshire & the Humber, 1987.0, (1822), 1787.4, (1639)
    77. Leicester, East Midlands, 1984.0, (7024), 1574.4, (5574)
    78. Lisburn and Castlereagh, Northern Ireland, 1976.8, (2895), 1975.4, (2893)
    79. Bolsover, East Midlands, 1976.5, (1607), 1708.4, (1389)
    80. Hounslow, London, 1974.9, (5367), 1830.6, (4975)
    81. Mid and East Antrim, Northern Ireland, 1974.3, (2753), 1526.1, (2128)
    82. East Riding of Yorkshire, Yorkshire & the Humber, 1972.0, (6768), 1447.0, (4966)
    83. Sandwell, West Midlands, 1969.4, (6480), 1553.3, (5111)
    84. High Peak, East Midlands, 1966.9, (1822), 1904.3, (1764)
    85. Cheshire East, North-west England, 1961.1, (7583), 1841.4, (7120)
    86. North Lincolnshire, Yorkshire & the Humber, 1957.2, (3381), 1490.6, (2575)
    87. Derby, East Midlands, 1947.3, (5001), 1810.3, (4649)
    88. Bassetlaw, East Midlands, 1942.8, (2298), 1630.0, (1928)
    89. North Ayrshire, Scotland, 1940.4, (2605), 1708.0, (2293)
    90. Manchester, North-west England, 1937.8, (10769), 1910.6, (10618)
    91. Sheffield, Yorkshire & the Humber, 1937.5, (11416), 1704.8, (10045)
    92. Wrexham, Wales, 1933.0, (2630), 1763.3, (2399)
    93. Ashfield, East Midlands, 1929.3, (2476), 1830.3, (2349)
    94. Stafford, West Midlands, 1928.1, (2658), 1705.4, (2351)
    95. Gedling, East Midlands, 1926.6, (2278), 1923.2, (2274)
    96. Leeds, Yorkshire & the Humber, 1922.5, (15357), 1648.6, (13169)
    97. Swindon, South-west England, 1913.1, (4264), 1656.9, (3693)
    98. Telford and Wrekin, West Midlands, 1907.1, (3458), 1371.0, (2486)
    99. North West Leicestershire, East Midlands, 1901.6, (1993), 1647.8, (1727)
    100. Wyre Forest, West Midlands, 1896.4, (1918), 1313.0, (1328)
    101. Lichfield, West Midlands, 1895.2, (2002), 1713.4, (1810)
    102. Ealing, London, 1881.1, (6402), 1812.3, (6168)
    103. Stoke-on-Trent, West Midlands, 1875.5, (4813), 1432.8, (3677)
    104. Charnwood, East Midlands, 1865.6, (3515), 1655.4, (3119)
    105. Mansfield, East Midlands, 1865.6, (2040), 1705.5, (1865)
    106. Falkirk, Scotland, 1861.6, (2989), 1790.6, (2875)
    107. Staffordshire Moorlands, West Midlands, 1848.1, (1819), 1353.3, (1332)
    108. Harborough, East Midlands, 1843.3, (1761), 1640.2, (1567)
    109. Ards and North Down, Northern Ireland, 1837.0, (2977), 1804.9, (2925)
    110. South Derbyshire, East Midlands, 1834.4, (2009), 1681.9, (1842)
    111. Tamworth, West Midlands, 1831.8, (1408), 1627.5, (1251)
    112. Richmondshire, Yorkshire & the Humber, 1823.9, (980), 1086.9, (584)
    113. South Ayrshire, Scotland, 1823.6, (2045), 1683.6, (1888)
    114. Bracknell Forest, South-east England, 1820.2, (2260), 1806.5, (2243)
    115. Coventry, West Midlands, 1819.0, (6901), 1452.3, (5510)
    116. Kettering, East Midlands, 1807.0, (1847), 1589.8, (1625)
    117. Great Yarmouth, Eastern England, 1802.5, (1788), 1509.1, (1497)
    118. Craven, Yorkshire & the Humber, 1799.9, (1032), 1459.8, (837)
    119. Amber Valley, East Midlands, 1796.2, (2314), 1672.8, (2155)
    120. Bedford, Eastern England, 1793.5, (3133), 1640.6, (2866)
    121. East Staffordshire, West Midlands, 1792.9, (2168), 1309.9, (1584)
    122. Redditch, West Midlands, 1785.7, (1528), 1751.8, (1499)
    123. Fife, Scotland, 1784.1, (6675), 1430.3, (5351)
    124. Hillingdon, London, 1783.1, (5510), 1765.3, (5455)
    125. Harrow, London, 1778.2, (4487), 1754.8, (4428)
    126. Bradford, Yorkshire & the Humber, 1777.3, (9635), 1126.1, (6105)
    127. Solihull, West Midlands, 1773.4, (3857), 1611.6, (3505)
    128. Luton, Eastern England, 1770.3, (3780), 1535.2, (3278)
    129. South Lakeland, North-west England, 1769.2, (1856), 1627.2, (1707)
    130. Newcastle-under-Lyme, West Midlands, 1764.5, (2287), 1368.7, (1774)
    131. Rushmoor, South-east England, 1751.3, (1653), 1538.3, (1452)
    132. Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland, 1744.6, (2587), 1480.2, (2195)
    133. Slough, South-east England, 1742.9, (2607), 1285.0, (1922)
    134. Carmarthenshire, Wales, 1736.2, (3300), 1709.9, (3250)
    135. Newark and Sherwood, East Midlands, 1733.2, (2134), 1699.1, (2092)
    136. Eden, North-west England, 1720.8, (925), 1211.1, (651)
    137. Peterborough, Eastern England, 1717.0, (3479), 1350.3, (2736)
    138. Thanet, South-east England, 1716.4, (2428), 1507.9, (2133)
    139. Surrey Heath, South-east England, 1708.4, (1524), 1670.3, (1490)
    140. Daventry, East Midlands, 1699.8, (1478), 1405.4, (1222)
    141. Ipswich, Eastern England, 1695.9, (2306), 1465.7, (1993)
    142. Perth and Kinross, Scotland, 1694.4, (2574), 1454.8, (2210)
    143. Bristol, South-west England, 1693.4, (7889), 1558.0, (7258)
    144. Shropshire, West Midlands, 1688.9, (5496), 1422.5, (4629)
    145. Cherwell, South-east England, 1683.3, (2556), 1673.4, (2541)
    146. Scarborough, Yorkshire & the Humber, 1679.3, (1826), 1135.8, (1235)
    147. Bromsgrove, West Midlands, 1677.5, (1687), 1593.9, (1603)
    148. Angus, Scotland, 1673.3, (1938), 1324.5, (1534)
    149. Aberdeen City, Scotland, 1665.9, (3816), 1425.8, (3266)
    150. Three Rivers, Eastern England, 1645.3, (1546), 1612.3, (1515)
    151. Woking, South-east England, 1640.9, (1641), 1617.9, (1618)
    152. Dundee City, Scotland, 1640.2, (2441), 1590.5, (2367)
    153. Northampton, East Midlands, 1639.8, (3678), 1358.5, (3047)
    154. Hambleton, Yorkshire & the Humber, 1626.2, (1495), 1294.4, (1190)
    155. Reading, South-east England, 1626.0, (2607), 1481.9, (2376)
    156. Nottingham, East Midlands, 1609.9, (5427), 1597.5, (5385)
    157. Birmingham, West Midlands, 1600.9, (18259), 1365.2, (15570)
    158. Gloucester, South-west England, 1599.0, (2074), 1193.4, (1548)
    159. Swale, South-east England, 1598.5, (2414), 1487.3, (2246)
    160. Stratford-on-Avon, West Midlands, 1595.9, (2113), 1398.8, (1852)
    161. Norwich, Eastern England, 1587.5, (2257), 1563.5, (2223)
    162. Wellingborough, East Midlands, 1585.9, (1270), 1369.9, (1097)
    163. West Lindsey, East Midlands, 1577.2, (1517), 1379.6, (1327)
    164. East Suffolk, Eastern England, 1574.9, (3943), 1410.3, (3531)
    165. Warwick, West Midlands, 1571.3, (2277), 1564.4, (2267)
    166. South Kesteven, East Midlands, 1561.9, (2237), 1490.7, (2135)
    167. East Lothian, Scotland, 1561.6, (1685), 1537.5, (1659)
    168. Harrogate, Yorkshire & the Humber, 1558.1, (2517), 1350.1, (2181)
    169. Plymouth, South-west England, 1553.8, (4084), 1185.5, (3116)
    170. South Gloucestershire, South-west England, 1552.7, (4469), 1390.5, (4002)
    171. Vale of White Horse, South-east England, 1551.0, (2139), 1382.8, (1907)
    172. Portsmouth, South-east England, 1541.7, (3310), 1397.4, (3000)
    173. Highland, Scotland, 1538.5, (3622), 1270.9, (2992)
    174. Gosport, South-east England, 1522.2, (1289), 1192.7, (1010)
    175. Wokingham, South-east England, 1521.2, (2646), 1453.3, (2528)
    176. Worcester, West Midlands, 1520.0, (1524), 1491.0, (1495)
    177. Eastleigh, South-east England, 1517.9, (2057), 1447.8, (1962)
    178. North Kesteven, East Midlands, 1513.3, (1788), 1491.3, (1762)
    179. Fareham, South-east England, 1512.8, (1760), 1277.3, (1486)
    180. Eastbourne, South-east England, 1502.1, (1552), 1234.0, (1275)
    181. Powys, Wales, 1496.7, (1991), 1491.4, (1984)
    182. East Northamptonshire, East Midlands, 1488.9, (1416), 1455.3, (1384)
    183. North Devon, South-west England, 1484.2, (1457), 827.1, (812)
    184. Oxford, South-east England, 1475.7, (2237), 1347.8, (2043)
    185. Rutland, East Midlands, 1470.0, (595), 1242.7, (503)
    186. South Oxfordshire, South-east England, 1464.7, (2106), 1444.5, (2077)
    187. Buckinghamshire, South-east England, 1459.4, (7984), 1393.1, (7621)
    188. Aberdeenshire, Scotland, 1448.3, (3777), 1216.0, (3171)
    189. Bournemouth Christchurch and Poole, South-west England, 1441.9, (5724), 1341.3, (5325)
    190. Havant, South-east England, 1434.2, (1812), 1298.1, (1640)
    191. Test Valley, South-east England, 1426.5, (1814), 1395.1, (1774)
    192. West Berkshire, South-east England, 1412.9, (2239), 1349.8, (2139)
    193. North Somerset, South-west England, 1411.1, (3042), 1181.5, (2547)
    194. Folkestone and Hythe, South-east England, 1403.1, (1590), 1276.9, (1447)
    195. Torbay, South-west England, 1402.9, (1911), 855.2, (1165)
    196. Bath and North East Somerset, South-west England, 1402.0, (2753), 1298.7, (2550)
    197. South Northamptonshire, East Midlands, 1393.8, (1331), 1267.1, (1210)
    198. Forest of Dean, South-west England, 1390.2, (1211), 1013.7, (883)
    199. Southampton, South-east England, 1376.2, (3480), 1322.4, (3344)
    200. Cambridge, Eastern England, 1371.3, (1715), 1253.8, (1568)
    201. Adur, South-east England, 1364.8, (876), 1296.2, (832)
    202. King’s Lynn and West Norfolk, Eastern England, 1362.0, (2060), 1278.7, (1934)
    203. East Cambridgeshire, Eastern England, 1345.2, (1213), 1157.8, (1044)
    204. Cheltenham, South-west England, 1342.6, (1558), 1171.1, (1359)
    205. Wychavon, West Midlands, 1340.4, (1757), 1170.2, (1534)
    206. Fenland, Eastern England, 1333.3, (1361), 1252.0, (1278)
    207. South Holland, East Midlands, 1331.1, (1276), 959.8, (920)
    208. Hastings, South-east England, 1326.8, (1228), 1064.2, (985)
    209. East Lindsey, East Midlands, 1326.5, (1884), 1146.2, (1628)
    210. Herefordshire, West Midlands, 1320.7, (2557), 1172.9, (2271)
    211. South Somerset, South-west England, 1314.2, (2217), 944.3, (1593)
    212. Mendip, South-west England, 1310.5, (1524), 1028.5, (1196)
    213. Dover, South-east England, 1307.9, (1550), 1259.8, (1493)
    214. Exeter, South-west England, 1298.3, (1731), 988.5, (1318)
    215. West Suffolk, Eastern England, 1297.8, (2301), 1155.1, (2048)
    216. Sedgemoor, South-west England, 1287.2, (1589), 1012.6, (1250)
    217. Wiltshire, South-west England, 1286.3, (6484), 1184.8, (5972)
    218. Horsham, South-east England, 1283.4, (1867), 1260.7, (1834)
    219. Winchester, South-east England, 1271.4, (1601), 1265.0, (1593)
    220. Dorset, South-west England, 1257.8, (4777), 1109.0, (4212)
    221. Mid Suffolk, Eastern England, 1238.8, (1299), 1170.2, (1227)
    222. East Hampshire, South-east England, 1236.3, (1531), 1195.1, (1480)
    223. Torridge, South-west England, 1228.2, (844), 778.5, (535)
    224. Breckland, Eastern England, 1226.9, (1733), 1169.5, (1652)
    225. Stroud, South-west England, 1225.8, (1482), 1100.9, (1331)
    226. Somerset West and Taunton, South-west England, 1225.7, (1905), 1021.1, (1587)
    227. South Hams, South-west England, 1215.5, (1069), 914.2, (804)
    228. North Norfolk, Eastern England, 1215.2, (1278), 1077.3, (1133)
    229. Wealden, South-east England, 1197.7, (1949), 1188.4, (1934)
    230. Boston, East Midlands, 1194.3, (846), 979.7, (694)
    231. Tewkesbury, South-west England, 1164.3, (1125), 1071.2, (1035)
    232. Arun, South-east England, 1158.1, (1866), 1028.4, (1657)
    233. Chichester, South-east England, 1136.6, (1381), 1089.6, (1324)
    234. Teignbridge, South-west England, 1125.6, (1520), 912.3, (1232)
    235. West Devon, South-west England, 1111.5, (624), 735.7, (413)
    236. Malvern Hills, West Midlands, 1101.4, (875), 941.5, (748)
    237. Cornwall and Isles of Scilly, South-west England, 1099.3, (6327), 894.7, (5149)
    238. East Devon, South-west England, 1094.0, (1620), 919.8, (1362)
    239. Mid Devon, South-west England, 1090.2, (908), 875.3, (729)
    240. Rother, South-east England, 1014.3, (981), 872.7, (844)
    241. Isle of Wight, South-east England, 877.0, (1248), 856.7, (1219)
    242. Shetland Islands, Scotland, 721.5, (165), 612.2, (140)
  • Louis Allwood

    WFH and face masks could go by the end of January

    The PM yesterday urged Brits to keep it on track insisting: “We can do it, we can all get boosted now.”

    But while data shows the Omicron wave peaking, take-up of third jabs has plummeted.

    Just 141,495 third doses were put in arms on Sunday — compared to almost a million a day in December. One in three eligible Brits is still not boosted.

    Take-up in some areas is so low that batches of the Pfizer jab are being wasted as the vaccine cannot be stored once opened.

    Politicians and medics warn that waning booster rates could delay a return to normality when the Plan B rules are reviewed on January 26.

  • Louis Allwood

    Covid roundup:

    • OFFICIALS began drawing up a “living with Covid” blueprint to phase out free tests and contact tracing this spring;
    • THE PM backed reducing isolation to five days if science allows;
    • DOCTORS admitted bungling their evidence against reducing isolation, and;
    • CABINET minister Michael Gove said he was wrong to back more restrictions before Christmas — and that the PM called it right.

    Latest figures

    Figures out yesterday showed there were 77 deaths across the UK, up from 42 a week earlier.

    Another 142,224 positive tests were announced yesterday — down by ten per cent compared to last Monday — but higher than Sunday’s figure.

    Hospital Covid patient admissions have flattened out for now.

    But Mr Johnson told The Sun last night: “Two doses aren’t enough against Omicron — you need to get a booster. Three jabs will give you the best protection against severe illness which is why it’s so important people continue to come forward.”

    Writing in The Sun today, top doc Sir Jonathan Van Tam stresses: “The higher the uptake for those all-important booster jabs, the fewer people end up in hospital and the sooner the pandemic will be over. It really is as simple as that.”

    Post-pandemic blueprint

    A blueprint for a post-pandemic world is being worked on by Whitehall officials.

    Ideas include an end to free lateral flow tests as soon as April, and scaling back of vaccines to an annual jab for the most vulnerable.

    There would be a phasing-out of legal restrictions on isolating and the contact tracing system.

    Pressure is growing on medics to cut the isolation time to five days, with the PM backing the idea publicly for the first time.

    Garden party (Continued…)

    Less than an hour earlier, Minister Oliver Dowden had told the public at the daily press conference to stick to meeting in pairs outdoors.

    Ex-aide Dominic Cummings alleged the PM and his wife Carrie attended the bash — which is now being investigated by top civil servant bulldog Sue Gray.

    The Met police have said they are speaking to the Cabinet Office about the possible breach of lockdown rules.

    A spokesperson said: “The Metropolitan Police Service is aware of widespread reporting relating to alleged breaches of the Health Protection Regulations at Downing Street on 20 May 2020 and is in contact with the Cabinet Office.”

    PM and Carrie ‘attended “bring your own booze” garden party’

    Boris Johnson and his wife Carrie are alleged to have attended the “bring your own booze” bash in the garden behind No10 in May, 2020.

    At that time, people were only allowed to meet in pairs outdoors. But it is understood around 40 people gathered in the garden, along with the Prime Minister, enjoying drinks and picnic food.

    An email invite was sent out by the PM’s Principal Private Secretary Martin Reynolds to more than 100 employees at No10, including advisors, speech-writers and door staff.

    The email, published by ITV News, said: “After what has been an incredibly busy period, it would be nice to make the most of the lovely weather and have some socially distanced drinks in the No10 garden this evening.

    “Please join us from 6pm and bring your own booze!”

    Man, 51, dies from Covid because he was too scared of needles

    Stewart Gilray, 51, lost his battle for life after the virus attacked his lungs – and now widow Bec has urged Brits to get the jab, even if they’re nervous.

    The veteran games creator, who lived in Aberdeen, Scotland, was part of the industry for over three decades before he passed away.

    Stewart told pals on social media that he contracted the virus last month. He was admitted to hospital on December 20.

    The dad-of-two then sadly died last week.

    Bec told the Daily Record: “Stewart had a serious fear of needles. In all seriousness, in 25 years he had one blood test.

    “He avoided trying to go to the doctor’s in case they ever needed to draw blood, but the truth is Stewart wasn’t poorly in the 25 years I knew him.

    “He was fit – he could have lost a stone or two like the rest of us – but he genuinely believed he was going to survive this virus because he was healthy.

    “Before he was intubated he said to me: ‘There’s nothing to worry about. I’m going to be fine. I just need a little rest.'”

    • Louis Allwood

      Boris wants to follow science on Covid – science says it’s time to start dismantling ‘Plan B’

      This is a comment piece by Iain Duncan Smith

      THE past two years have undoubtedly been tough for the nation, with so many of us experiencing bereavement.

      But we can be cheered that, thanks to our world-beating vaccine programme, recent statistics show the virus is finally in retreat.

      Data released by the UK Health Security Agency yesterday shows cases dropped by close to ten per cent in a week to 142,224, falling for a fifth day in a row.

      Now it’s time to start to plan, with some degree of urgency, about how we live with Covid and get on with our lives.

      Some good ideas are already being aired — and should be enacted.

      We should cut the time people have to self-isolate. Reducing it to five days seems sensible. It is the current ten-day requirement (seven if testing negative) that is leading to a shortage of doctors and nurses in hospitals and other key workers.

      Next, we need to start the process of dismantling “Plan B” and getting people back to their offices, instead of working from home.

      This is not just so companies can thrive again but, importantly, for their workers’ mental health and wellbeing.

    • Louis Allwood

      New Omicron epicentre emerges

      A NEW Omicron epicentre has emerged and this interactive map reveals if your local area is a hotspot for infections.

      Coronavirus cases have risen in 242 areas in the last seven days and there are five areas where infections have climbed at a rapid rate.

      Cases have fallen in just 134 areas in the seven days to January 7 and the map above shows current infection rates, with an epicentre of infections forming in the North East of England.

      Derry City & Strabane in Northern Ireland continues to have the highest rate of Covid infections in the UK, with 6,065 new cases in the seven days to January 6, the equivalent of 4,013.7 per 100,000 people.

      This is up from a rate of 3,777.4 for the seven days to December 30.

      Fermanagh & Omagh in Northern Ireland has the second highest rate, up from 2,922.4 to 3,309.3, with 3,883 new cases.

      Figures for Northern Ireland as a whole show that six additional deaths were recorded yesterday, with a further 2,706 cases.

    • Joseph Gamp

      Hancock tests positive for Covid for 2nd time – but he 'feels fine'

      Former health secretary Matt Hancock has tested positive for Covid-19 after contracting the virus for a second time.

      Mr Hancock said he has been self-isolating at home since Monday afternoon following the test result.

      "Yesterday afternoon I tested positive for coronavirus. I've been isolating at home since then," he said on Twitter.

      "Thankfully I feel fine. Much better than last time and that's thanks to the vaccine. Get your booster now if you haven't already."

      Mr Hancock initially contracted the virus in April 2020 at the height of the first wave of the pandemic, before vaccines were available.

      He was forced to resign as health secretary in June 2021 after the leak of CCTV footage showing him cavorting in his office with an aide, in breach of social-distancing rules at the time.

    • Joseph Gamp

      PM's position 'untenable' if he attended party (continued…)

      Conservative backbencher Nigel Mills warned that any senior figure who willingly attended the event could not have a position setting Covid-19 policy.

      "It is utterly untenable, we have seen people resign for far less than that," he told BBC News.

      "If the Prime Minister knowingly attended a party, I can't see how he can survive having accepted resignations for far less.

      "He accepted the resignation of his spokesperson (Allegra Stratton) for not attending a party but joking about it at a time of much lighter restrictions. I just think that's untenable."

      Mr Mills added: "I don't think we need an inquiry to work out whether the Prime Minister was there. He knows whether he was there or not. Just come out and say what happened.

      "If he was there he better try a hugely fulsome apology and see if the country will buy it but I'm not sure they will."

      Source: Read Full Article