A father and son have cute matching white patches in their hair thanks to a genetic condition that has spanned six generations in their family.

Dance artist Gabriel Cesar Bufe, 39, from Rio Segundo, Argentina, was keen to know whether his son, Farid, 10, would be born with the signature family hair – a pure white patch over his forehead.

Gabriel and around half of his family were born with piebaldism, a genetic condition causing areas of skin and hair to be lighter due to a lack of melanocytes to give pigment.

Those among Gabriel’s family who have piebaldism include his father, grandmother, seven of his uncles, four of his cousins and five of his cousins’ children, and, he was delighted to find, his own son.

When he was a young boy, strangers would stare at Gabriel’s unique hair and kids at his school would call him a skunk, but he learned to embrace it – even going so far as to call himself Pepé Le Pew after Looney Tunes’ famous cartoon skunk.

Now, Gabriel also notices people staring at him and his son when they’re out together, and he wants to instil the same pride he has in his unique hair in Farid.



People ask the two if they’ve dyed their hair to look this way, and they laugh in response.

Farid was asked the same question in school all the time, but now he says the other kids are used to his hair.

Meanwhile, Gabriel says his hair has helped him stand out from the crowd as a dancer, and thinks his unique look helped him get jobs on television as a magician and illusionist early on in his career.

‘Seeing that my son had piebaldism when he was born was a really emotional experience,’ said Gabriel.

‘The white spot covered about a fifth of his head. All of the family were guessing whether the baby would have the spot or not which was really exciting.

‘I felt very proud about my son having the spot because he’s my second child and the first one doesn’t have it.


‘When I was growing up, it didn’t make any difference to me because it was something completely normal in my family.

‘Of course it affected my life, I had to get used to people looking at me.

‘When I was a child, other guys used to tell me I was a skunk so I would respond by saying I was Pepé Le Pew.

‘People tend to be much nicer to me now and tell me things like I’m gifted or even that I’m one of the X-men.

‘When I walk with my son, strangers stare and whisper about our black and white hair.


‘What is interesting is that most of them think we dye our hair to match each other.

‘We feel very proud about it because it’s like a trademark in our family.

‘I always tell my son that whenever someone meets you, they never forget you.

‘I wanted to be on stage and I became a magician and illusionist and made appearances on TV shows.

‘My piebaldism really helped because I felt I was really original. I didn’t need to do anything else to stand out.’



Gabriel hopes that encouraging Farid to be proud of his unique hair just like he is will help foster a wider acceptance for people with unconventional appearances.

He said: ‘People are born with all kinds of differences. From the colour of their skin to the colour of their hair.

‘Today it’s a point of difference that myself and my son are able to wear with pride.

‘I wouldn’t ever consider dyeing my hair as it is part of my identity.

‘If I had the option to heal my condition, I would not do it.’

Do you have a story to share?

Get in touch by emailing [email protected]

Source: Read Full Article