THE CERVIX is a passageway into the body that not everyone has.

But what is it, what does it do and who has one? Here we answer everything you need to know.


What is the cervix?

The cervix is part of the reproductive system that sits between the womb/uterus and the top of the vagina, inside the body.

It sometimes gets the name “the neck of the womb”.

To look at, it’s a bit like a ring doughnut the size of two inches.

The fleshy ring has many functions; it helps keep the vagina clean, for example.

It also can provide pleasure during sex – although it is not possible to penetrate the opening of it, it can be bumped up against.

Importantly, the cervix is vital for protecting a foetus during pregnancy by creating a mucus plug that stops bacteria out of the womb.

When the baby is ready to come out, the cervix opens up to allow the baby to come out. This is what doctors look at to say whether the patient is “dilated” during labour.

It’s important to protect the cervix, as cervical cancer can be deadly.

Anyone with a cervix is encouraged to get their free NHS smear test when invited, which checks for anything abnormal on the cervix.

Sex and your body

Everything you need to know about sex and your body

Why does sex hurt?

Can you have sex while pregnant?

Can you have sex on your period?

How long should sex last?

The exact number of times you should be having sex each week

What causes premature ejaculation?

How many calories does sex burn?

What is a squirting orgasm?

The sex positions most likely to give you a UTI

Do men have a cervix?

Those who have a cervix include women, transgender (trans) men and people assigned female at birth.

Some trans men have a total hysterectomy and have the cervix – as well as ovaries and womb – removed.But not all choose to do this.

Men do not biologically have a cervix because it is part of the female reproductive system.

Meanwhile, some women need to have them removed or in very rare cases, are not born with a cervix.

Most read in Health

CARE SCARE

Nurses to strike for first time in union's history TODAY with cancer care hit

TAKEN TOO SOON

Pink coffin for girl, 5, driven through street after she died from Strep A

OUR AGONY

Mum's tribute to her son who died of Strep A after doctors misdiagnosed flu

THIGH HIGH

Why your bigger thighs and cellulite are actually a good thing for your health

How to book in for a check

Cervical screening's are done by a GP or female nurse or doctor.

You'll get a letter sent to book your appointment and it's important that you schedule it as soon as you can.

You can usually do this by following the instructions sent on the letter, for some surgeries this will mean an online booking and others will be on the phone.

What are the symptoms of cervical cancer?

There are no obvious symptoms during the early stages of cervical cancer – that’s why it’s best to keep up with your smears when reminded by your GP.

However, vaginal bleeding can often be a tell-tale sign, especially if it occurs after sex, in between periods or after the menopause.

That said, abnormal bleeding is not a definite sign of the condition, just a possible indicator.

Nevertheless, it should be investigated by your GP as soon as possible.

Other warning signs include:

  • pain and discomfort during sex
  • unusual or unpleasant vaginal discharge
  • pain in your lower back or pelvis

And if it spreads to other organs, the signs can include:

  • pain in your lower back or pelvis
  • severe pain in your side or back caused by your kidneys
  • constipation
  • peeing or pooing more than usual
  • losing control of your bladder or bowels
  • blood in your pee
  • swelling in one or both legs
  • severe vaginal bleeding

It's best to book it for when you have finished your period or for when you have finished treatment for an infection.

Read More on The Sun

Love Island star swipes at Molly- Mae after she claimed show didn’t help career

I’m a housing expert – my easy tips that will help prevent condensation

The NHS says you should avoid using any vaginal medicines, lubricants or creams in the 2 days before you have your test as they can affect the results.

If you are worried about your cervix then you should book an appointment to see your GP.

Source: Read Full Article