Fascinating POV footage takes you on a ride on Europe’s highest railway, with the train tunnelling through Switzerland’s mountains to 11,000ft above sea level

  • The video follows the Jungfrau Railway in Switzerland’s Bernese Alps 
  • It travels from Kleine Scheidegg to Jungfraujoch, Europe’s highest train station 
  • Jungfraujoch station is buried beneath the peaks of Jungfrau and Monch

Sit back and enjoy a ride on Europe’s highest railway courtesy of an eye-opening POV video.

The footage was filmed via a camera attached to the front of a cogwheel train on the Jungfrau Railway in Switzerland’s Bernese Alps, showing the thrilling ascent from Kleine Scheidegg train station to Jungfraujoch – which, at 3,454m (11,332ft) above sea level, is Europe’s highest train station. 

A long stretch of the nine-kilometre (5.8 miles) line tunnels through the North Face of the Eiger mountain, with Jungfraujoch station buried beneath the peaks of Jungfrau and Monch. 

A new video shows the route taken by Europe’s highest railway, the Jungfrau Railway (pictured) in Switzerland’s Bernese Alps 

The video was filmed via a camera attached to the front of a cogwheel train on the Jungfrau Railway. It begins with the train ground to a halt at Kleine Scheidegg station (above) 

A long stretch of the line tunnels through the North Face of the Eiger mountain (above) 

The video begins with the train ground to a halt at Kleine Scheidegg station, which sits at 2,061m (6,762ft) above sea level. 

This is Europe’s highest railway hub – many passengers take trains here from the villages of Grindelwald or Lauterbrunnen to experience the Jungfrau Railway.

The Jungfrau Railway then weaves its way through the snow-covered mountains, passing through a tunnel before arriving at Eigergletscher station – home to the railway’s workshop – which is the final stop before the train enters the Jungfrau tunnel. 

The footage shows the train weaving its way through the snow-covered mountains

Above is Eigergletscher station, the train’s final stop before entering the Jungfrau tunnel

Pictured above is the entrance to the Jungfrau tunnel

Once the railway’s traffic lights turn green, the train carries on through more snowy terrain before entering the darkness of the tunnel, where it passes by the Eigerwand station, which has been closed to the public since 2016.

The video shows the train stopping at Eismeer station, where passengers get off to take in views of the glacier Ischmeer from observation windows that have been built into the face of the mountain.

Finally, the footage fades out as swarms of travellers disembark the train after it arrives at Jungfraujoch. 

Most of these passengers will hop into the ultrafast lift that takes them to the ‘Sphinx’ observatory on the rocky summit above the station, where they’ll find indoor and outdoor viewing platforms. 

The video shows the train stopping at Eismeer station (above), where passengers get off and take in views from the observation windows that have been built into the face of the mountain

The footage fades out at Jungfraujoch, Europe’s highest train station, where swarms of travellers disembark

From the station, they can also walk along a tunnel to the ‘Top of Europe’ building complex, which overlooks the Aletsch Glacier.

At the ‘Top of Europe’, there’s a Lindt chocolate shop for those with a sweet tooth, or for something more substantial, visitors can head to ‘Restaurant Crystal’ for some ‘authentic Swiss’ cuisine.

Before visitors return to Jungfraujoch, they can explore the complex’s ‘Ice Palace’ – a series of ice-covered walkways with ice sculptures of creatures such as eagles, penguins or bears. ‘Mountain guides created the aisles and halls in the 1930s with picks and saws,’ the website reveals. 

From Jungfraujoch station, passengers can ascend a rapid lift to the viewing platforms on the ‘Sphinx’ observation deck (pictured) overhead 

Construction on the railway, which is electrified, began in 1896, and it finally opened to the public in 1912.

The journey takes around 30 minutes, with the route running 365 days a year and attracting thousands of visitors annually. Tripadvisor user ‘RVJ10’, who travelled on the railway this March, wrote: ‘Wow, what an experience – it is spectacular and the views [are] breathtaking.’ 

A return ticket from Grindelwald to Jungfraujoch costs around £92. For more information visit www.jungfrau.ch.

Source: Read Full Article